Sponsored Ad:
See the top rated post in this thread. Click here

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: GRE score improvement range

  1. #1
    Trying to make mom and pop proud zanelabw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    29
    Rep Power
    2


    Good post? Yes | No

    GRE score improvement range

    Sponsored Ad:
    Hi there

    I need to improve on my GRE scores to apply to b schools.


    Just wondering: have any of you significantly improved on your GRE scores the second time you did the test? If so, by how much?


    I need to make almost a 50-60 percentile increase.. not sure if this is a reasonable improvement range. I reckon we are all different and learn in different rates but I suppose I need some real encouragement that this could happen if I tried hard and studied for longer.



    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Within my grasp! Dak601's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    161
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Hi Zane,

    this is related to the GMAT vs. the Gre, but I still think it's applicable. I think your own success may depend on how much you studied the first time, as it does seem their are diminishing returns, but similar to most things, one can often see improvement with an investment of time. I don't know about GRE, but there are several GMAT forums that show countless examples of improvement with diligent study- I assume there are the same for GRE (and they likely provide study tips as well). I achieved a significant improvement in my score with intense study, and leveraged Magoosh (relatively low-cost) and other books/ study guides. Obviously everyone is different, but I see no reason why diligent study would result in score improvements if you are committed and have the time to invest.

  3. #3
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    144
    Rep Power
    3


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    If you need a 50 to 60% increase in percentile, then chances are, your current scores are abysmally low.

    With regards to the quant section, I believe it's possible since the math in the GRE isn't terribly difficult if you take a bit of time to actually familiarise yourself with the way questions are asked and stuff like that.

    As for Verbal, there's very little chance you can make such a giant leap in the next attempt, in my opinion. Getting 150+ shouldn't be too hard, though. Just try making intelligent guesses for the vocabulary questions that you don't know. That's what I did.

    For AWA, just write a long essay with a few fancy words thrown in, and you're pretty much assured a 4.5 at least, if you've displayed a generally coherent argument.

  4. #4
    Trying to make mom and pop proud zanelabw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    29
    Rep Power
    2


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    My current scores are painfully low (below 50th percentile)

    I am just debating whether I should take an offer I have now (rather lower ranked Canadian school but great advisor/prolific researcher) or take an extra year in my current masters program to study hard for the GRE and try to raise my scores to what the US schools need.


    Any input would be much appreciated. I am very torn. Would you take that risk?

  5. #5
    Eager! BrazilianPhD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    94
    Rep Power
    2


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful. Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Quote Originally Posted by zanelabw View Post
    My current scores are painfully low (below 50th percentile)

    I am just debating whether I should take an offer I have now (rather lower ranked Canadian school but great advisor/prolific researcher) or take an extra year in my current masters program to study hard for the GRE and try to raise my scores to what the US schools need.

    Any input would be much appreciated. I am very torn. Would you take that risk?
    If I had an offer, I would take it.

    In the GMAT, I increased my score from about 70th percentile (from the time I knew almost nothing about the GMAT) to the 98th percentile (my last official score). But it took about a year to do that. And so far my score has not been enough to get many positive results from US schools. I guess the GRE will not be so different.

    You seem to need an even greater improvement. It's feasible, but it is very hard. And even if you improve, it's not guaranteed you will get an offer from a US school.

    But of course I'm not you, I don't know your goals and your readyness to face a very long and arduous period of study for a slim chance of success at a US school.

  6. #6
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    144
    Rep Power
    3


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Quote Originally Posted by zanelabw View Post
    My current scores are painfully low (below 50th percentile)

    I am just debating whether I should take an offer I have now (rather lower ranked Canadian school but great advisor/prolific researcher) or take an extra year in my current masters program to study hard for the GRE and try to raise my scores to what the US schools need.


    Any input would be much appreciated. I am very torn. Would you take that risk?
    Well, your application won't survive the first round of cuts if you have a low GRE. I suppose you should ask yourself this: Given that you've given the GRE a go, do you see yourself being able to get a 160+ for Quant and at least a 155 for Verbal? You ought to realise that a 160 can be seen as a bare minimum.​ Most competitive programmes have tons of application and set the soft cut at 165+, perhaps?

    Now, this might not be entirely applicable here, seeing as to how this relates to Business PhD programmes. It was posted over in the urch Econs PhD page in one of the threads a couple days ago. It's a pretty interesting read. It might help allay some of your concerns of going to a lower ranked programme.

    https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.28.3.205

  7. #7
    Trying to make mom and pop proud zanelabw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    29
    Rep Power
    2


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    Well, your application won't survive the first round of cuts if you have a low GRE. I suppose you should ask yourself this: Given that you've given the GRE a go, do you see yourself being able to get a 160+ for Quant and at least a 155 for Verbal? You ought to realise that a 160 can be seen as a bare minimum.​ Most competitive programmes have tons of application and set the soft cut at 165+, perhaps?

    Now, this might not be entirely applicable here, seeing as to how this relates to Business PhD programmes. It was posted over in the urch Econs PhD page in one of the threads a couple days ago. It's a pretty interesting read. It might help allay some of your concerns of going to a lower ranked programme.

    https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/jep.28.3.205
    Wow- what an extremely interesting article. Thanks for sharing. The finding did not surprise me, as when I sifted through the CVs of PhD students (in OB) from both top and low ranked b schools, I also noticed this trend.


    However this does beg the question: When it comes to hiring PhD graduates, do top b schools put more weight on the reputation of the school the graduate attended or his/her research productivity? I.e., say if Jim has 2 publications in a T10 range school, but Andrew has 15 publications in a university not even on the UTD top 100... who would get hired?

    I'd say Jim would get hired (the reputation of the school matters more here). But am open to what you guys think.

  8. #8
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    London, United Kingdom
    Posts
    208
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Another spin on the same scenario.

    If Andrew has 15 publications, his school would definitely be in the top 50, if not top 20. Provided they are in a top journal.

    The top schools are on top due to their publication output. So a super productive PhD student should automatically push the rankings of his/her lower ranked school higher.

    Quote Originally Posted by zanelabw View Post
    Wow- what an extremely interesting article. Thanks for sharing. The finding did not surprise me, as when I sifted through the CVs of PhD students (in OB) from both top and low ranked b schools, I also noticed this trend.


    However this does beg the question: When it comes to hiring PhD graduates, do top b schools put more weight on the reputation of the school the graduate attended or his/her research productivity? I.e., say if Jim has 2 publications in a T10 range school, but Andrew has 15 publications in a university not even on the UTD top 100... who would get hired?

    I'd say Jim would get hired (the reputation of the school matters more here). But am open to what you guys think.

  9. #9
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    144
    Rep Power
    3


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Quote Originally Posted by zanelabw View Post
    Wow- what an extremely interesting article. Thanks for sharing. The finding did not surprise me, as when I sifted through the CVs of PhD students (in OB) from both top and low ranked b schools, I also noticed this trend.


    However this does beg the question: When it comes to hiring PhD graduates, do top b schools put more weight on the reputation of the school the graduate attended or his/her research productivity? I.e., say if Jim has 2 publications in a T10 range school, but Andrew has 15 publications in a university not even on the UTD top 100... who would get hired?

    I'd say Jim would get hired (the reputation of the school matters more here). But am open to what you guys think.
    While it's naive to think that the programme's reputation won't play a part in securing an academic position upon graduation, I believe more weight is placed on the department's perception of your 'research capabilities'. Therefore, as long as you're doing good research, whichever programme you come from doesn't matter as much, to a large extent.

    It's worth nothing that you're also operating on the assumption that you'll produce the same quality of work through 2 different programmes. It's entirely possible that you gel better with the faculty of a lower ranked programme, and hence will be able to produce better material.

    If you look through the paper again, the top students of each programme are doing well regardless of where they graduated from.

    Hypothetically speaking, Andrew would show greater research potential and hence, might be the one to get employed. However, those publications must be from the top tier journals, for the quantity to matter at all. There isn't much worth in numerous publications in a local journal, since the quality isn't observable to the departments.

  10. #10
    A long long time ago XanthusARES's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    1,388
    Blog Entries
    14
    Rep Power
    10


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: GRE score improvement range

    Quote Originally Posted by zanelabw View Post
    However this does beg the question: When it comes to hiring PhD graduates, do top b schools put more weight on the reputation of the school the graduate attended or his/her research productivity? I.e., say if Jim has 2 publications in a T10 range school, but Andrew has 15 publications in a university not even on the UTD top 100... who would get hired?
    A few notes on this. This hypothetical scenario is extremely unlikely. At least in marketing our CB candidates from last year had a total of 3 A publications before they interviewed for schools. Let me say that again. Of all of the CB applicants, there were 3 total A pubs published total. Notice I used total twice in that sentence, just let that sink in. 3 A pubs across hundreds of applicants. A publications are hard, really hard. So someone having 15, at least in my field, is completely unreasonable. From what I know of other fields, this is similar.

    But let's ignore this for the moment. Obviously your point wasn't to talk about specifics of the publishing process, but rather to ask about two candidates one from HBS (Jim) and one from Case Western Reserve University (Andrew). (before I continue I am in no way downplaying the effectiveness of Case Western to get you where you need to be, simply pointing out that objectively they are lower ranked than HBS. It's a good AACSB accredited school with some great faculty.) So let's put this in real numbers. Jim has 0 A publications coming out of HBS on the market. Likely he has one or two submitted, but nothing accepted yet. Andrew has 2 A pubs accepted and published (and, theoretically, more research down the pipeline). They are both on the job market and are interested in top research schools, exclusively.

    Before we can ask the question who will get hired, we need to ask the question who will get interviewed? In my opinion, Jim is more likely to get interviewed by all schools than Andrew. Unless Andrew's A pubs are with famous faculty from other programs (which is extremely possible) the names on his rec letters will be coming from lower ranked profs, and likely won't hold much weight at Stanford where he'll be applying. Jim on the other hand has the great name of HBS behind him, so doors will just be open for him that won't be open for Andrew. Is this fair? No. But it is true.

    Andrew will likely end up at a school that is higher ranked than Case Western, but he won't end up at Northwestern. Jim also may not end up at a top program because he doesn't have any publications, but there is a good chance that he'll end up at a higher ranked school than Andrew, at least initially. If Andrew continues to be a beast of a researcher, and uses his time and resources wisely, there is a good chance that eventually he'll end up at a great school. And if Jim squanders his chances and doesn't do good research, he'll likely end up at a much lower ranked school, but will always be viewed with an air of respect from those who don't really know the field. This respect will stem from the fact that he went to HBS.

    I suspect that others on here will disagree with me. There is a strong feeling in academia that people who succeed do so because they work hard. And let me be extremely clear, people in academia who are successful do work hard (I'm speaking broadly here). But pedigree matters, a lot. And I would strongly disagree strongly with anyone who says otherwise. We can talk about the implications of this later.

    Alright, so this was a long post, but here's what it means, in short.
    1. Jim is more likely to get an interview than Andrew.
    2. This does not make Jim a better person or researcher.
    3. Andrew will likely have to work harder to receive the same opportunities as Jim and likely will not see those opportunities directly out of the PhD program.
    4. This does not mean that you should go to the best school available to you (although we can talk about this later too, if you want).
    5. Fit matters a lot to your life and research, so Andrew's life may just be better than Jim's.
    6. We define our own success. Andrew may end up being highly cited and respected in our field. Some well respected profs aren't necessarily at top schools. A lot of well respected profs are 100% at top schools, though, keep that in mind.

    I've tried to keep my personal biases out of this, but obviously they are still there. I'm open to talk about any of them if you're interested. Just let me know.
    Til now I always got by on my own
    I never really cared until I met you...

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Input on potential score improvement
    By tightfist in forum GRE
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-15-2015, 09:15 PM
  2. gre verbal score improvement
    By douglaskusi in forum Open
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-15-2012, 03:17 PM
  3. GRE Verbal score improvement
    By EEPHDWANNABE in forum GRE
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-12-2004, 01:23 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-13-2003, 02:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •