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Thread: Profile Evaluation(rather atypical background) for LSE MSc Econ (2 yrs) Please!

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    Profile Evaluation(rather atypical background) for LSE MSc Econ (2 yrs) Please!

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    Hi, guys!
    Iíve been a lurker in the forum for quite a long time and have found a lot of useful information! Thank you all!
    However, it seems that not many people are talking about the 2 years version of LSEís MSc Economics. Iíve applied to the MSc Econ program (2 year) at LSE, so I desperately want someone to evaluate my chance of admission to the program in the context of my unconventional academic background. Any input is greatly appreciated.
    Here is my profile.

    Type of Undergrad: Double degree, Bachelor of Arts in Business English and Bachelor of Economics in Finance (I know this sounds weird, but this is what we call a finance major in our country)
    Type of School: A decent specialized university in my own country (not top in overall ranking, but still respected in the field of economics and business studies. Moreover, it should be known to the selectors at LSE since several students from my school were admitted by them every year)
    Undergrad GPA: 3.92/4.00 or 92% (rank: 1/160)
    Type of Grad: n/a
    Grad GPA: n/a
    GRE: Q:170 (98%) V:170 (99%) AW: 4.0 (54%)
    Below comes the atypical part of my background.
    Due to my double degree, I took a lot of English courses, and, as a result, less economics and finance courses than a typical finance major would take. I list all (yes, that's all) the math, economics, and finance courses I have taken below.
    Math Courses: Advanced mathematics I (95%. 90+ is A and 85+ is A- in my university), Advanced mathematics II (99%), Probability and statistics (97%), Linear algebra (97%), Applied statistics (95%)
    Econ & Fin Courses: Microeconomics (92%), Macroeconomics (85%), Principles of Economics (97%), Introduction to money and banking (90%), Introduction to Financial Accounting (96%), Public Finance (92%), International Finance (89%), International trade (97%), International Economics (94%), International Risk and Insurance (90%), Corporate Finance (98%), Bank Management (97%), International Political Economy in Asian Pacific (95%), Studies in Latin American Economy (92%)
    Courses Currently Taken: Econometrics, Investments, Financial Derivatives
    Letters of Recommendation: one from the dean of my school who is not in the field of economics but who can attest to my academic abilities and extracurricular activities, another from an associate professor of international trade who knows me well
    Research Experience: RA for one semester, one senior thesis for BEcon in Finance (both are related to corporate finance and governance), and one senior thesis for BA in Business English
    Teaching Experience: peer microeconomics tutor, volunteer community English teacher
    research Interests: financial markets, with special attention to corporate finance and governance
    SOP: decent but nothing spectacular
    Applying to: LSE MSc (2 year), Cambridge diploma, Duke, Boston, McGill, UT-Austin ( I do not care about locations since I am an international)

    As I did not take intermediate economics, I choose the 2-year route of the MSc program. I apply to MSc Economics (rather than Finance & Economics) because I am research-oriented and this program gives me a very solid foundation in economic theory and econometrics which will be beneficial for my further study (PhD in Economics very probably)

    My Concerns:
    1) Lack of advanced mathematics courses: my mathematical background just meets the minimum entry requirement
    2) Letter of recommendation: both of my referees are absolutely unknown to selectors at LSE
    3) Low AW score in GRE: I got 4, but LSEís website says they expect AW score above 5.0. Moreover, my GRE scores appear to be unbalanced.
    4) Quantatitive ability: LSE's website says explicitly that they want students from quantitative subjects. Since a huge part of my undergraduate study focuses on language, I do not know whether my undergraduate study is quantitative enough for the MSc.


    Questions:
    1) Will my unconventional academic background hurt my chance of admission? Are my econ and math courses enough preparation for the 2-year MSc program?
    2) Will LSE be more lenient on my GRE AW score because I am an international? Are they serious that they expect a score of over 5.0 in AW?
    3) Any suggestion on other programs I could apply to?

    Sorry for the long post. I am desperate to know my chance.

    Thank you very much in advance!
    Last edited by harrq; 11-21-2013 at 04:03 PM.

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    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage sulebrahim's Avatar
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    my thinking is that if people from your school do get admitted, then being that you are the top ranked this year, you should be competitive. That doesn't mean admission, but I think you would get in to one of the schools you applied to.
    Was your principles of econ class more like intro to micro and macro combined, while Micro and macro were intermediate? I ask this because sometimes the names of similar courses are different across schools.
    Hopefully someone with experience at those schools can chime in but I think your profile, despite the AWA score should be competitive. The math is reasonable as well. You can go into detail about what your advanced mathematics classes covered.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sulebrahim View Post
    my thinking is that if people from your school do get admitted, then being that you are the top ranked this year, you should be competitive. That doesn't mean admission, but I think you would get in to one of the schools you applied to.
    Was your principles of econ class more like intro to micro and macro combined, while Micro and macro were intermediate? I ask this because sometimes the names of similar courses are different across schools.
    Hopefully someone with experience at those schools can chime in but I think your profile, despite the AWA score should be competitive. The math is reasonable as well. You can go into detail about what your advanced mathematics classes covered.
    Thank you sulebrahim! Your message is very encouraging.

    To your questions regarding the economics courses, yes. The names of the courses can be confusing because they are translations of their names in original language. The Principles of Economics course is a intro-level course, and it is part of my BA in Business English curriculum. Mirco and Macro are part of my BEcon in Finance curriculum, but I do not think they can be counted as intermediate level (partially intermediate at most. For micro, we use Pindyck. For macro, we use Dornbusch).

    In Advanced Mathematics, we mainly covered univariable calculus, multivariable calculus, deferential equations, etc.

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    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage
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    Your profile looks pretty impressive to someone (myself) who has absolutely no knowledge of your university. The lack of intermediate micro is going to hurt you. I would go ahead and apply to all of those schools and see what happens: while I wouldn't suggest that someone with your profile apply to PHD programs, I think that for a master's you should be in good shape.

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    Hi, guys!
    Iíve been a lurker in the forum for quite a long time and have found a lot of useful information! Thank you all! However, it seems that not many people are talking about the 2 years version of LSEís MSc Economics. Iíve applied to the MSc Econ program (2 year) at LSE, so I desperately want someone to evaluate my chance of admission to the program in the context of my unconventional academic background. Any input is greatly appreciated.
    Here is my profile.

    Type of Undergrad: Double degree, Bachelor of Arts in Business English and Bachelor of Economics in Finance (I know this sounds weird, but this is what we call a finance major in our country)
    Type of School: A decent specialized university in my own country (not top in overall ranking, but still respected in the field of economics and business studies. Moreover, it should be known to the selectors at LSE since several students from my school were admitted by them every year)
    Undergrad GPA: 3.92/4.00 or 92% (rank: 1/160)
    Type of Grad: n/a
    Grad GPA: n/a
    GRE: Q:170 (98%) V:170 (99%) AW: 4.0 (54%)
    Below comes the most atypical part of my background.
    Due to my double degree, I took a lot of English courses, and, as a result, less economics and finance courses than a typical finance major would take. I list all (yes, that's all) the math, economics, and finance courses I have taken below.
    Math Courses: Advanced mathematics I (95%. 90+ is A and 85+ is A- in my university), Advanced mathematics II (99%), Probability and statistics (97%), Linear algebra (97%), Applied statistics (95%)
    Econ & Fin Courses: Microeconomics (92%), Macroeconomics (85%), Principles of Economics (97%), Introduction to money and banking (90%), Introduction to Financial Accounting (96%), Public Finance (92%), International Finance (89%), International trade (97%), International Economics (94%), International Risk and Insurance (90%), Corporate Finance (98%), Bank Management (97%), International Political Economy in Asian Pacific (95%), Studies in Latin American Economy (92%)
    Courses Currently Taken: Econometrics, Investments, Financial Derivatives
    Letters of Recommendation: one from the dean of my school who is not in the field of economics but who can attest to my academic abilities and extracurricular activities, another from an associate professor of international trade who knows me well
    Research Experience: RA for one semester, one senior thesis for BEcon in Finance (both are related to corporate finance and governance), and one senior thesis for BA in Business English
    Teaching Experience: peer microeconomics tutor, volunteer community English teacher
    research Interests: financial markets, with special attention to corporate finance and governance
    SOP: decent but nothing spectacular
    Applying to: LSE MSc (2 year), Cambridge diploma, Duke, Boston, McGill, UT-Austin ( I do not care about locations since I am an international)

    As I did not take intermediate economics, I choose the 2-year route of the MSc program. I apply to MSc Economics (rather than Finance & Economics) because I am research-oriented and this program gives me a very solid foundation in economic theory and econometrics which will be beneficial for my further study (PhD in Economics very probably)

    My Concerns:
    1) Lack of advanced mathematics courses: my mathematical background just meets the minimum entry requirement
    2) Letter of recommendation: both of my referees are absolutely unknown to selectors at LSE
    3) Low AW score in GRE: I got 4, but LSEís website says they expect AW score above 5.0. Moreover, my GRE scores appear to be unbalanced.
    4) Quantatitive ability: LSE's website says explicitly that they want students from quantitative subjects. Since a huge part of my undergraduate study focuses on language, I do not know whether my undergraduate study is quantitative enough for the MSc.



    Questions:
    1) Will my unconventional academic background hurt my chance of admission? Are my econ and math courses enough preparation for the 2-year MSc program?
    2) Will LSE be more lenient on my GRE AW score because I am an international? Are they serious that they expect a score of over 5.0 in AW?
    3) Any suggestion on other programs I could apply to?

    Sorry for the long post. I am desperate to know my chance.

    Thank you very much in advance!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by to2012 View Post
    Your profile looks pretty impressive to someone (myself) who has absolutely no knowledge of your university. The lack of intermediate micro is going to hurt you. I would go ahead and apply to all of those schools and see what happens: while I wouldn't suggest that someone with your profile apply to PHD programs, I think that for a master's you should be in good shape.
    Thank you to2012!

    Myuniversity is neither a plus nor a huge drag for my application (maybe myuniversity will be on looked unfavorably by some selectors due to its lowoverall ranking). I think you are right, to2012. My main concern is my lack ofquantitatively-oriented courses and intermediate courses.



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    Why my profile disappeared? I post it again here...

    Hi, guys!
    Iíve been a lurker in the forum for quite a long time and have found a lot of useful information! Thank you all! However, it seems that not many people are talking about the 2 years version of LSEís MSc Economics. Iíve applied to the MSc Econ program (2 year) at LSE, so I desperately want someone to evaluate my chance of admission to the program in the context of my unconventional academic background. Any input is greatly appreciated.
    Here is my profile.

    Type of Undergrad: Double degree, Bachelor of Arts in Business English and Bachelor of Economics in Finance (I know this sounds weird, but this is what we call a finance major in our country)
    Type of School: A decent specialized university in my own country (not top in overall ranking, but still respected in the field of economics and business studies. Moreover, it should be known to the selectors at LSE since several students from my school were admitted by them every year)
    Undergrad GPA: 3.92/4.00 or 92% (rank: 1/160)
    Type of Grad: n/a
    Grad GPA: n/a
    GRE: Q:170 (98%) V:170 (99%) AW: 4.0 (54%)
    Below comes the most atypical part of my background.
    Due to my double degree, I took a lot of English courses, and, as a result, less economics and finance courses than a typical finance major would take. I list all (yes, that's all) the math, economics, and finance courses I have taken below.
    Math Courses: Advanced mathematics I (95%. 90+ is A and 85+ is A- in my university), Advanced mathematics II (99%), Probability and statistics (97%), Linear algebra (97%), Applied statistics (95%)
    Econ & Fin Courses: Microeconomics (92%), Macroeconomics (85%), Principles of Economics (97%), Introduction to money and banking (90%), Introduction to Financial Accounting (96%), Public Finance (92%), International Finance (89%), International trade (97%), International Economics (94%), International Risk and Insurance (90%), Corporate Finance (98%), Bank Management (97%), International Political Economy in Asian Pacific (95%), Studies in Latin American Economy (92%)
    Courses Currently Taken: Econometrics, Investments, Financial Derivatives
    Letters of Recommendation: one from the dean of my school who is not in the field of economics but who can attest to my academic abilities and extracurricular activities, another from an associate professor of international trade who knows me well
    Research Experience: RA for one semester, one senior thesis for BEcon in Finance (both are related to corporate finance and governance), and one senior thesis for BA in Business English
    Teaching Experience: peer microeconomics tutor, volunteer community English teacher
    research Interests: financial markets, with special attention to corporate finance and governance
    SOP: decent but nothing spectacular
    Applying to: LSE MSc (2 year), Cambridge diploma, Duke, Boston, McGill, UT-Austin ( I do not care about locations since I am an international)

    As I did not take intermediate economics, I choose the 2-year route of the MSc program. I apply to MSc Economics (rather than Finance & Economics) because I am research-oriented and this program gives me a very solid foundation in economic theory and econometrics which will be beneficial for my further study (PhD in Economics very probably)

    My Concerns:
    1) Lack of advanced mathematics courses: my mathematical background just meets the minimum entry requirement
    2) Letter of recommendation: both of my referees are absolutely unknown to selectors at LSE
    3) Low AW score in GRE: I got 4, but LSEís website says they expect AW score above 5.0. Moreover, my GRE scores appear to be unbalanced.
    4) Quantatitive ability: LSE's website says explicitly that they want students from quantitative subjects. Since a huge part of my undergraduate study focuses on language, I do not know whether my undergraduate study is quantitative enough for the MSc.



    Questions:
    1) Will my unconventional academic background hurt my chance of admission? Are my econ and math courses enough preparation for the 2-year MSc program?
    2) Will LSE be more lenient on my GRE AW score because I am an international? Are they serious that they expect a score of over 5.0 in AW?
    3) Any suggestion on other programs I could apply to?

    Sorry for the long post. I am desperate to know my chance.

    Thank you very much in advance!

  8. #8
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    I am the OP. I post my profile again since it's funny that it disappeared.

    Hi, guys!

    Iíve been a lurker in the forum for quite a long time and have found a lot of useful information! Thank you all! However, it seems that not many people are talking about the 2 years version of LSEís MSc Economics. Iíve applied to the MSc Econ program (2 year) at LSE, so I desperately want someone to evaluate my chance of admission to the program in the context of my unconventional academic background. Any input is greatly appreciated.
    Here is my profile.

    Type of Undergrad: Double degree, Bachelor of Arts in Business English and Bachelor of Economics in Finance (I know this sounds weird, but this is what we call a finance major in our country)
    Type of School: A decent specialized university in my own country (not top in overall ranking, but still respected in the field of economics and business studies. Moreover, it should be known to the selectors at LSE since several students from my school were admitted by them every year)
    Undergrad GPA: 3.92/4.00 or 92% (rank: 1/160)
    Type of Grad: n/a
    Grad GPA: n/a
    GRE: Q:170 (98%) V:170 (99%) AW: 4.0 (54%)
    Below comes the most atypical part of my background.
    Due to my double degree, I took a lot of English courses, and, as a result, less economics and finance courses than a typical finance major would take. I list all (yes, that's all) the math, economics, and finance courses I have taken below.
    Math Courses: Advanced mathematics I (95%. 90+ is A and 85+ is A- in my university), Advanced mathematics II (99%), Probability and statistics (97%), Linear algebra (97%), Applied statistics (95%)
    Econ & Fin Courses: Microeconomics (92%), Macroeconomics (85%), Principles of Economics (97%), Introduction to money and banking (90%), Introduction to Financial Accounting (96%), Public Finance (92%), International Finance (89%), International trade (97%), International Economics (94%), International Risk and Insurance (90%), Corporate Finance (98%), Bank Management (97%), International Political Economy in Asian Pacific (95%), Studies in Latin American Economy (92%)
    Courses Currently Taken: Econometrics, Investments, Financial Derivatives
    Letters of Recommendation: one from the dean of my school who is not in the field of economics but who can attest to my academic abilities and extracurricular activities, another from an associate professor of international trade who knows me well
    Research Experience: RA for one semester, one senior thesis for BEcon in Finance (both are related to corporate finance and governance), and one senior thesis for BA in Business English
    Teaching Experience: peer microeconomics tutor, volunteer community English teacher
    research Interests: financial markets, with special attention to corporate finance and governance
    SOP: decent but nothing spectacular
    Applying to: LSE MSc (2 year), Cambridge diploma, Duke, Boston, McGill, UT-Austin ( I do not care about locations since I am an international)

    As I did not take intermediate economics, I choose the 2-year route of the MSc program. I apply to MSc Economics (rather than Finance & Economics) because I am research-oriented and this program gives me a very solid foundation in economic theory and econometrics which will be beneficial for my further study (PhD in Economics very probably)

    My Concerns:
    1) Lack of advanced mathematics courses: my mathematical background just meets the minimum entry requirement
    2) Letter of recommendation: both of my referees are absolutely unknown to selectors at LSE
    3) Low AW score in GRE: I got 4, but LSEís website says they expect AW score above 5.0. Moreover, my GRE scores appear to be unbalanced.
    4) Quantatitive ability: LSE's website says explicitly that they want students from quantitative subjects. Since a huge part of my undergraduate study focuses on language, I do not know whether my undergraduate study is quantitative enough for the MSc.


    Questions:
    1) Will my unconventional academic background hurt my chance of admission? Are my econ and math courses enough preparation for the 2-year MSc program?
    2) Will LSE be more lenient on my GRE AW score because I am an international? Are they serious that they expect a score of over 5.0 in AW?
    3) Any suggestion on other programs I could apply to?

    Sorry for the long post. I am desperate to know my chance.

    Thank you very much in advance!

  9. #9
    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage sulebrahim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrq View Post
    Thank you sulebrahim! Your message is very encouraging.

    To your questions regarding the economics courses, yes. The names of the courses can be confusing because they are translations of their names in original language. The Principles of Economics course is a intro-level course, and it is part of my BA in Business English curriculum. Mirco and Macro are part of my BEcon in Finance curriculum, but I do not think they can be counted as intermediate level (partially intermediate at most. For micro, we use Pindyck. For macro, we use Dornbusch).

    In Advanced Mathematics, we mainly covered univariable calculus, multivariable calculus, deferential equations, etc.
    Based on the reviews on Amazon, someone said he used Pindyck in grad school, one of the reviewers mentioned something about partial derivatives. That sounds at least intermediate micro to me. From my experience, intermediate Micro varies across schools in the US. Some schools do a lot of optimization problems but most do graphs and derivatives of cost functions and all that.
    The same with Dornbusch

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sulebrahim View Post
    Based on the reviews on Amazon, someone said he used Pindyck in grad school, one of the reviewers mentioned something about partial derivatives. That sounds at least intermediate micro to me. From my experience, intermediate Micro varies across schools in the US. Some schools do a lot of optimization problems but most do graphs and derivatives of cost functions and all that.
    The same with Dornbusch
    Yes. The textbooks we use are intermediate. However, the micro and macro courses are actually the first two econ courses I have taken in college (and it appears to be so on my transcript), and we skipped some very quantitative part of the contents. Moreover, my university has intermediate courses (which I did not take), and they use different textbooks.

    But my perception is that lack of intermediate-level courses would not hurt my chance of admission to LSE's 2-year program, since it is for undergraduates who did not take economics as their main subject. Is my perception right?

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