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skidrow
10-31-2010, 04:34 AM
Hi, TMers :)
LSE Again :D
I find there are two one-year EME programs -- EME(research) and EME. What's the difference?
If I want to pursue a top PhD program, is EME(research) the most suitable in LSE?

undergrad
11-07-2010, 01:16 PM
Hi!

I'm applying to LSE too, and what I've understood from their website is that the EME research program is for those who'd like to progress to a PhD at LSE or elsewhere, whereas the EME program is just masters for those who'd like to get a job after earning their degree, or those who don't satisfy the qualifications required to progress to a PhD and will be considered for the research program depending on how they perform academically.
I've also seen somewhere on the threads here that for those who have a strong background in Mathematics and Economics, a 1 yr course makes more sense because what they teach over 2 years in the research program recaps some of what you may have studied in your undergraduate course.
I know the above sounds contradictory but it's just a gist of what I've read at several places.
I hope someone corrects me if I'm wrong! :)

OneMoreEcon
11-07-2010, 01:34 PM
The distinction may have changed recently, but there used to be one main reason for the (Research) degree. At least for UK nationals (and possibly EU nationals), you can get 1+3 or 2+2 ESRC funding for "research" degrees (1 year masters + 3 years PhD or 2 year masters + 2 years PhD). For that, you would need to apply to the (Research) version, though this should not be an issue for non-Europeans. However, there may be other funding opportunities for non-Europeans that are contingent upon joining a "research" degree.

The other difference I remember hearing but that you should verify is that the (Research) degree may grant an automatic admission to the PhD conditional on degree result (Distinction or Merit, not sure which), while the other does not guarantee admission.

yangyangwilliam
11-07-2010, 02:29 PM
One thing I still don't get is that many people who don't have an extremely impressive undergrad performance can get offers from very top programs in the States with their a one-year econ program at LSE. Since they will need to apply for PhD right after they arrive at LSE, why does the master's degree add any value to their application? They don't even have grades for their courses, and the whay can the faculty write about a student? Any thoughts?

norules4suresh
11-07-2010, 03:24 PM
This I took from the LSE website for getting a clear idea of which course to apply and how the fees works, it is a bit annoying since the information given was not pretty straightforward and not easily accessible.....may be I am terribly lazy! :P

MSc Economics (One Year)
Admissions Requirement: first class honours with concentration on economics and quantitative subjects and at least a year of calculus and statistics.
**A dissertation is required as part of the assessment of the option course.

MSc Economics (Research)
Admissions Requirement: first class honours with concentration on economics and quantitative subjects and at least a year of calculus and statistics.
An offer for a place on the MSc Economics (Research) will include a conditional offer of progression to Track 2 of the MRes/PhD, subject to the attainment of a distinction grade in the MSc.

MSc Economics (Two year programme)
Admissions Requirement: a first class honours degree with two semesters of college-level calculus or equivalent. To be eligible to apply for the two year route, a student should have a strong academic qualification with emphasis on quantitative subjects. We give detailed attention to transcripts and look for strength in mathematics and statistics especially.
**Students who have not previously studied economics are required to first take LSE Summer School courses in introductory macroeconomics and introductory microeconomics. Alternatively, such students may arrange to take equivalent courses elsewhere, subject to obtaining prior confirmation that the proposed courses are acceptable to us.

MSc Econometrics & Mathematical Economics (One year)
Admissions Requirement: First class honours degree or equivalent with strong background in economic theory, econometrics, statistics and mathematics.

MSc Econometrics & Mathematical Economics (Research)
Admissions Requirement: First class honours degree or equivalent with strong background in economic theory, econometrics, statistics and mathematics.
**An offer for a place on the MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics (Research) will include a conditional offer of progression to Track 2 of the MRes/PhD, subject to the attainment of a Distinction grade in the MSc.

MSc Econometrics & Mathematical Economics (Two year programme)
Admissions Requirement: First class honours degree or equivalent with strong quantitative background including linear algebra and multivariate calculus. Some coursework in econometrics and economics is desirable.

MRes/PhD Economics-Track 1-Duration: 4 years.
Admissions Requirement: First class degree with exceptional grades in economics, econometrics, mathematics and other quantitative subjects.
Direct entry to the MRes/PhD programme (Track 1) is aimed at students with exceptional undergraduate grades in economics, mathematics, econometrics and other quantitative subjects.
An MRes (Master of Research) degree will be awarded to students who pass the three core courses, the field course and the research paper. Those who perform well enough in all five elements will progress to PhD registration at the start of year three.

MRes/PhD Economics-Track 2-Duration: 2-3 years.
Admissions Requirement: Exceptional marks in graduate economics programme.
This route is recommended by selectors for applicants who would first need to take our core courses at MSc level before moving on to the advanced MRes/PhD core courses. Students take either the MSc Economics or the MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics in their first year.
An MRes (Master of Research) degree is awarded to students who pass the required four coursework elements. Those who perform well enough will progress to PhD registration.
**Students interested in Track 2 should apply either to the MSc Economics (Research) or MSc EME (Research).

Mojojo
11-07-2010, 08:34 PM
Hello there,
I have also applied to the LSE EME ( one year ) and will be applying to Toulouse M1 soon too.
I have a few questions about EME and LSE in general, and this seems like an appropriate thread to pose them in.
(I have searched in past threads for clear answers on these, but in vain)

1) Would one be permitted to take as one of the two math/stats courses an undergraduate course ( Real analysis for example ) - or are they completely inflexible on this point?

2) Is one allowed to take the two math/stats courses both in the same term ( Michaelmas / Lent) ?
If yes, and anyone here has experience from lse - would you say this is a bad idea?

3) More subjective probably: Is either of the econometric analysis course(ec 484) or advanced microeconomics(ec 487) one much harder then the other -
and so more important to prepare for? I have the choice of taking either a game theory course or a time series course this spring,
and am thinking I'll take the first. However if the econometric analysis course at lse is particularly brutal, I might take the
time series course this spring, in case it prepares me a little better for ec484. Silly? What do you think?

dinosaurus
11-08-2010, 12:52 AM
EC484 has the reputation of being extremely difficult.