PDA

View Full Version : US masters with an econometrics focus



purplejesus28
11-17-2010, 09:49 PM
Hello all,

I am interested in pursuing a terminal masters in econometrics. However, the catch is that I do not plan to do anything with it. I already have a pretty set career path, but my employer will pay for additional schooling and it's something that I've always been interested in.

Do any of you know of a good terminal masters program with an econometrics (or financial economics) focus?

If it helps, I go to a mid-tier private college, majored in statistics and economics, GPA ~3.85, and no GRE yet.

Thanks for any responses!

The MAN
11-18-2010, 02:48 AM
...I do not plan to do anything with it. I already have a pretty set career path, but my employer will pay for additional schooling and it's something that I've always been interested in.

This sounds like a recipe for disaster, but what do I know. Are you going to be working at your job while taking classes or will you focus on school full-time?

Your best bet would be to look at AEA's list of graduate programs (you can do either a google search or search this forum and find it). Then look at all the programs that offer MAs and see if anything looks good to you.

kickerpa16
11-18-2010, 04:17 AM
Where do you live?

If location isn't a problem, Virginia Commonwealth University has a Terminal Master's program that requires you to take 3 Econometric courses (Cross Sectional, Time Series, and Econometrics I) to obtain the degree. They offer exclusively night classes, and it is geared towards working professionals (people with undergraduate degrees who work at Financial companies, the Fed (in Richmond, VA), and Dominion Power Company typically go to school there.

purplejesus28
11-18-2010, 04:43 AM
I should have clarified...I will be taking 1-1.5 years to pursue a masters full time. In terms of location, anywhere in the US is fine, but preferably somewhere worth spending 1-1.5 years of my life.

purplejesus28
11-18-2010, 04:49 AM
Where do you live?

If location isn't a problem, Virginia Commonwealth University has a Terminal Master's program that requires you to take 3 Econometric courses (Cross Sectional, Time Series, and Econometrics I) to obtain the degree. They offer exclusively night classes, and it is geared towards working professionals (people with undergraduate degrees who work at Financial companies, the Fed (in Richmond, VA), and Dominion Power Company typically go to school there.

Thanks for the VCU suggestion! This is in line with what type of program I'm looking for.

The MAN
11-18-2010, 02:48 PM
I will be taking 1-1.5 years to pursue a masters full time.

Many U.S. MA programs take 2 years (at least the few I have knowledge of do).

rthunder27
11-18-2010, 03:33 PM
Johns Hopkins Master of Arts in Applied Economics Degree Program (http://advanced.jhu.edu/academic/applied-economics/) has a terminal MA Applied Economics program based in DC, also intended for working professionals (lots of Fed, BLS etc). They offer econometrics, microeconometrics, macroeconometrics and financial econometrics, as well as other forecasting classes. Full disclosure, my employer currently pays for me to attend it, and I've found it to cover econometrics very well. I'll have finished the program in 16 months (10 courses total, I took 2 semesters of 2 courses, and 2 of 3 courses) while working a full 40 hour a week job.

Trifecta
11-19-2010, 01:33 AM
UNC Greensboro has a terminal Master's program with two required econometrics courses during the first semester, econometric methods (using intro Wooldridge with Stata) and econometric theory (using Greene with Stata and Matlab). They also offer time series econometrics and data mining courses as electives as well as a required data methods class during the final semester that is based on SAS.

The program is set up to be done in a year and a half and funding is available, although it sounds unnecessary in your case.

Home, Department of Economics, UNCG (http://www.uncg.edu/bae/econ/)

kevinp123
11-19-2010, 01:59 AM
Might not be exactly what you are looking for, but Chicago's MBA program has an econometrics focus.

SlowLearner38
11-19-2010, 02:03 AM
Johns Hopkins Master of Arts in Applied Economics Degree Program (http://advanced.jhu.edu/academic/applied-economics/) has a terminal MA Applied Economics program based in DC, also intended for working professionals (lots of Fed, BLS etc). They offer econometrics, microeconometrics, macroeconometrics and financial econometrics, as well as other forecasting classes. Full disclosure, my employer currently pays for me to attend it, and I've found it to cover econometrics very well. I'll have finished the program in 16 months (10 courses total, I took 2 semesters of 2 courses, and 2 of 3 courses) while working a full 40 hour a week job.

I have a friend who is in that program too and he said it is too easy, but that could be just his opinion. Then again, he is the smartest person I know.

rthunder27
11-19-2010, 03:09 AM
I have a friend who is in that program too and he said it is too easy, but that could be just his opinion. Then again, he is the smartest person I know.

Yea, I think it may be too easy myself, but then again, I like to think I'm one of the smartest people I know too (I thought the same thing during my EE undergrad). I think the real issue is that it teaches and then tests the material, but it skimps on the busy work. Maybe it's also because most of the people in the program were econ or poli sci undergrads that didn't expose themselves to a lot of math, or haven't really used it in a while. So if you understand the math concepts right off the bat, you're fine, and can coast through.

Bottom line, the program teaches the material, and you'll learn if you want to learn. It's probably not worth the price (~$3k per class), but if you're not paying for it then that doesn't matter.