PDA

View Full Version : How much of an issue is (lack of) permanent resident status on the job market?



Elliephant
11-20-2010, 03:27 AM
A very large percentage of PhD students at top econ departments come from abroad on student visas. How much harder is it for them to break into the US academic job market than for people with citizenship/residency? I gather the pool of American economists is so strong that schools rarely, if ever, have the incentive to bother with proving to the immigration authorities that a foreigner is by far the best person for a job. With our more liberal policies, we in Canada get quite a few American-educated foreigners on the job market. But then I've also seen a number of European, Indian and Chinese economists stick around in the States after finishing. So how much flexibility do people without permanent status have if they want to stay?

enginecon
11-20-2010, 10:46 PM
A very large percentage of PhD students at top econ departments come from abroad on student visas. How much harder is it for them to break into the US academic job market than for people with citizenship/residency? ... So how much flexibility do people without permanent status have if they want to stay?
As far as I know, it is a NON-issue... Non-perm-res who take an academic position in the US can easily get the H1b visa (work), which for universities is semi-automatic... One can only hold this status for a maximum of 6 consecutive years, though...but that is plenty of time for the employee to try to get a permanent residency through an appropriate category (employment-based, "extraordinary abilities", etc).

A more complicated case is that of those who as students held a visa that requires home-country residency (e.g., 2-year for a J visa holder)... exemptions can be obtained but the process is somewhat complicated. These people could conceivably opt to leave the US in case they cannot get an exemption and are unwilling/unable to satisfy the home-country residency requirement. However most PhD students do not have this requirement.

taurenchieftain
11-20-2010, 11:29 PM
most of the junior economists today, are in fact foreign.

Elliephant
11-21-2010, 02:51 AM
That's nice to know, thanks guys. This won't be an issue for me personally, but I was curious on behalf of a number of "more foreign" friends.