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usbuff
09-07-2004, 03:36 AM
Hi all,

I'm planning to take Writing, Math IIC, and maybe US History. WHat about you?

DrNet
09-07-2004, 02:16 PM
I've registered to take Writing, Math IIC and Physics

Erin
09-14-2004, 07:10 AM
Here in California, seniors (this year, anyway) are required to take the Writing and Math IC or IIC, plus a third test of their choice. The third test varies quite a bit, but many of our students choose Chinese, one of the sciences, or sometimes U.S. History. Actually, I've had a few students take more than three, just to see how they do and to show the adcomms that they are good in several diverse areas.

shuttupjessmah
05-06-2005, 02:13 AM
What do you suggest for people in Class of '06? I'm taking SAT II US History and SAT II Math this Saturday, and I'm planning on taking SAT II Physics and SAT II Spanish. (UC's won't take the SAT II Writing anymore, huh?) Yes, they're incredibly diverse. Schools won't be pissed and dock points because you don't take tests that pretain to your major, will they? (and I'm still undecided... but I have time...)

Erin
05-08-2005, 06:47 PM
What do you suggest for people in Class of '06? I'm taking SAT II US History and SAT II Math this Saturday, and I'm planning on taking SAT II Physics and SAT II Spanish. (UC's won't take the SAT II Writing anymore, huh?) Yes, they're incredibly diverse. Schools won't be pissed and dock points because you don't take tests that pretain to your major, will they? (and I'm still undecided... but I have time...)Hi Jess, sorry I didn't see this question before your test. :(

First, the tests you're taking and are signed up for look like a pretty good variety.

The SAT II Writing test doesn't even exist anymore, and the UCs will not accept past test scores, but not many people will have taken the SAT II Writing test anyway.

The standard advice is to take more of the math and science SAT IIs if you're planning to apply to such programs as engineering, biology, chemistry, etc. I'm sure you know that some programs require you to take certain tests to apply. If you're going to apply undeclared, it won't matter as much; you may want to take the tests in which you'll get the highest scores. For you, if you can get a high score, taking the SAT II Spanish would probably help, but again, make sure you can get a high score. Sometimes people think two or three years of Spanish will enable them to get a high score, but the test is probably more difficult than that.

mushroomt0p
05-11-2005, 03:06 AM
i'm going to take Math IIC, U.S. History (thx to AP us hist..i'm sorta prepared..), and AAHH Chemistry (I SO HATE!!)-too bad, I don't have any other choices...
so, UCs require 3 (?) subjects?? i just signed up for 3 cuz i got fee waivers :D
*i miss my SAT class :(

shuttupjessmah
05-14-2005, 01:39 AM
the UCs require two... I'm planning on taking a bunch of them... and then retaking more... and that's how my June, Nov, and Dec SAT dates are going to go... unless I bomb the SAT I in October... THEN I'll take the SAT I in December... hehe...

mushroomt0p
05-15-2005, 12:38 AM
geez..sounds hectic Good luck

shuttupjessmah
05-20-2005, 02:55 AM
with my incredibly sad GPA, i need superior test score to get into a good college... though, I hear the UCs are taking more 3.0 students these days... anyone know if it works for Berkeley or Davis?

HiLine
06-06-2005, 02:01 PM
I plan to take 3 subject tests including Maths,Physics and another science(Chemistry or biology).Could you please give me some advice of which of them would take me less time to study?:hmm: I really want to score 800 for each,so which would be easier for me to get the maximum score?Thank you very much.:)

shuttupjessmah
06-06-2005, 09:07 PM
I plan to take 3 subject tests including Maths,Physics and another science(Chemistry or biology).Could you please give me some advice of which of them would take me less time to study?:hmm: I really want to score 800 for each,so which would be easier for me to get the maximum score?Thank you very much.:)


First off, there are two versions of the biology test... thought I'd remind you. Second, if you're applying to the UCs, your two subject tests need to be in different disciplines. So remember that if and when you decide on your tests. I suggest taking tests in subjects that you've just finished studying or are studying because the subject will be fresh in your mind. heh... 800... that isn't going to be easy... you could take the Math IC, which is a hell of a lot easier than the Math IIC, but the UCs don't take the first one. I've only taken the physics test, so I can't really compare the tests.

I think this was very confusing, but anyway, the Mat IIC test has an extremely generous curve, however, even with that, many people at my school scored well below average (and we're one of the best schools in San Francisco).

babypurin
06-06-2005, 09:54 PM
IF you take the ACT and want to apply to the University of California system, do you still need to take SATII's?

Most colleges, at least in the Northeast, exempt you from taking SATII's if you take the ACT.

shuttupjessmah
06-07-2005, 12:49 AM
IF you take the ACT and want to apply to the University of California system, do you still need to take SATII's?


Yes, you do. The ACT only substitutes the SAT I. You still need two SAT IIs.

HiLine
06-07-2005, 01:47 AM
I've found some colleges still require SATIIs beside ACT but the others do not,that depends on each college's admission.
The high school education here is very different from the one in the USA:we study all the subjects in a school year,which means:next (school)year I will study the same sucjects as this year and will complete all the subjects at the end of high school.Therefore,I would need to complete the study program at home if I want to take the SAT II,that is why I asked you which subject would take me less time to complete.:) I plan to take the 3 SATIIs in october,that will help me prepare for the Maths and physics a lot (I am studying in the high school of Physics),but how about the Biology?
Ps:I admire your SAT I score,shuttupjessmah.

babypurin
06-07-2005, 10:06 PM
Yes, there are some colleges that still require SATII's if you take the ACT in the Northeast. It usually tends to be Ivy League Schools or speciality schools.
I say that, because there are many really good colleges that substitute the ACT for SAT I + II's, including Johns Hopkins, and Tufts.

HiLine
06-20-2005, 03:13 AM
I have 6 choices for SAT IIs:Maths(I + II),Physics,Chemistry and Biology(2 versions),should I take all of them?:hmm:

shuttupjessmah
06-20-2005, 07:11 AM
If you're applying to the UCs, don't even bother taking the Math Level I. However, if you aren't and you aren't strong in math, I suggest that test. Also, I think you should take tests in more than just two disciplines, just in case you aren't strong in math or science because the UCs take one score from each discipline. But it all depends on which colleges you apply to, what areas you feel strong in, and the college policies.

babypurin
06-20-2005, 02:46 PM
Pick the tests based on your strengths and weaknesses. If you are applying to the UC's where SATII's count a lot, it would be in your favor if you choose the ones you know you are going to score high.

Go to College Board's website and look at the sample questions, to see which one you would do best on. Also, the College Board published an SATII book that has a full practice test for each subject.

If you are applying to big public schools such as the UC's you might want to show off in essays or recommendations, as all of them get tons of apps with near perfect SAT/SATII's. It could be to your advantage if you show off your interest's in a different way, other than test scores. :)

shuttupjessmah
06-20-2005, 10:24 PM
some UCs don't take recommendations... in fact, I don't think any of them take any

Erin
06-20-2005, 11:39 PM
That is correct: The UCs do not accept recommendations for freshmen applicants. From the UC website:
Do not include letters of recommendation, transcripts, test score reports and other supporting documentation such as awards, photographs, poetry, etc., to the processor. They will not be forwarded, returned or retained. Please note that recommendations are important for students who appeal their UC admissions decision, though.

shanghaitest
07-29-2005, 11:52 AM
Just a note on the two math tests: even though the IC has easier math on it, the IIC is much more forgiving of careless errors. If you have good math skills, it's possible that you would do even better on the IIC than you would on the IC.

If you get to choose, you might want to take a practice test for each and see which one you are better at.

babypurin
07-29-2005, 03:40 PM
Just a note on the two math tests: even though the IC has easier math on it, the IIC is much more forgiving of careless errors. If you have good math skills, it's possible that you would do even better on the IIC than you would on the IC.

If you get to choose, you might want to take a practice test for each and see which one you are better at.

Eventhough IIC has a much more forgiving curve, I recommend you take IIC after Pre-Calc and IC after Algebra II/Trigonometry.

shanghaitest
07-29-2005, 05:13 PM
Because the education system is different in Asia, a lot of kids here don't have those set math categories. Also, I've found that because of language issues and differences in the types of math that are taught, the IIC test, which is more "mathy," can be easier for some of them.

I would strongly recommend taking both practice tests before deciding which test to take.

On a related note, a lot of the kids here feel that the math tested on the SAT I was extremely easy. The most common comment I've gotten when asking whether they know a formula or concept is, "We had to know that to get into high school." :doh:

Good luck to you, Hiline, and anyone else who's planning to take these tests soon!

babypurin
07-29-2005, 11:41 PM
Because the education system is different in Asia, a lot of kids here don't have those set math categories. Also, I've found that because of language issues and differences in the types of math that are taught, the IIC test, which is more "mathy," can be easier for some of them.

I would strongly recommend taking both practice tests before deciding which test to take.

On a related note, a lot of the kids here feel that the math tested on the SAT I was extremely easy. The most common comment I've gotten when asking whether they know a formula or concept is, "We had to know that to get into high school." :doh:

Good luck to you, Hiline, and anyone else who's planning to take these tests soon!

In America, at least, unless you have taken Pre-Calc you might not have covered enough of the IIC to make it a viable test to take. It might be easier for international students as they are likely to cover the material on the test way before they are a high-school senior so it should be a pretty easy decison on which test to take.

BTW, I'm reading this great book, "Life and Death in Shanghai" which provides a good insight on your fabulous city.

shanghaitest
07-31-2005, 02:00 PM
In America, at least, unless you have taken Pre-Calc you might not have covered enough of the IIC to make it a viable test to take. It might be easier for international students as they are likely to cover the material on the test way before they are a high-school senior so it should be a pretty easy decison on which test to take.

BTW, I'm reading this great book, "Life and Death in Shanghai" which provides a good insight on your fabulous city.

Unfortunately, most of the American kids I've seen have been woefully unprepared for even the math IC, so I'm definitely not going to argue about their preparedness for the IIC test.

Coming to Asia was a bit like going through the looking glass. Everything that was true in America came out backwards here. No math phobia, but verbal phobia. The students are completely willing to folllow instructions to the letter, but lack the ability to even choose sides on an essay writing test. That's one of the reasons that I suggest that international students take many different practice tests before deciding which real test to take. First, they'll actually do it, instead of taking one and a half, then deciding to watch the finale of "American Idol" instead. ;) Second, they are so full of surprises.

I haven't read that book yet, BTW. I'll try to get my hands on a copy. Maybe I'll see you in the tourist district sometime.

hippityhop
08-11-2005, 09:20 PM
I went into the Math IIC test with only one to two months of Precalculus class under my belt. To be honest, there were questions on the test that I didn't even know how to BEGIN to solve. The curve is extremely forgiving. I had skipped a bunch of questions and had, without a doubt, gotten many incorrect. When I found out I received a 770...I was in utter disbelief. I believe that if you score well on the IC, you should definitely consider taking the IIC, regardless of how much precalculus preparation you have.

babypurin
08-13-2005, 12:41 AM
I went into the Math IIC test with only one to two months of Precalculus class under my belt. To be honest, there were questions on the test that I didn't even know how to BEGIN to solve. The curve is extremely forgiving. I had skipped a bunch of questions and had, without a doubt, gotten many incorrect. When I found out I received a 770...I was in utter disbelief. I believe that if you score well on the IC, you should definitely consider taking the IIC, regardless of how much precalculus preparation you have.

While a 770 is an excellent score, especially for IIC, many top colleges are actually going to be looking for that 800 - I know it sounds stupid, but I do suggest a retake if you haven't so already. Remember if you take the IC, the curve isn't as generous - meaning you can't skip 4 miss 5 and still get an 800 - its more like skip 4 miss 5: 700.

HiLine
11-26-2005, 04:12 AM
Math IIC:800
Phys: 750
Chem:740

Should I retake the phys and chem tests?I am a natural-science-specialized student.