PDA

View Full Version : Anyone knows about the master programs in Warwick?



chrishacker
11-21-2012, 03:06 PM
I have seen websites of Warwick's economics department and I found that they provide a 'Msc in economics' and a 'Msc in behavioral and economic sciences'. Both of them require mathematical economics, advanced micro, metrics and an eassy. The difference is that the latter provides experimental economics and some courses on psychology instead of an additional semester of metrics, advanced macro and three electives on economics. Well, I want a Ph.D top 30 (or at least top 50) program in US or equivalent doctoral program in other English-speaking countries. So which one should I apply for as the best preparation? Any suggestions? Thanks. (I am really interested in experimental/behavioral economics, but I know little about psychology).

tm_member
11-21-2012, 04:38 PM
Best preparation for admission and passing first year would be the regular MSc., the other MSc would be more useful later on. It's a trade-off that only you can decide.

Are you good at math and already have great grades and LORs from undergrad? If so, you can probably afford to take the behavioral program and still do well when it comes to admission. You should be looking at targeting programs at Duke, CMU (their social decision sciences program), Caltech, Ohio State, and NYU for experimental and behavioral stuff. Lower ranked programs strong in experiments include Pittsburgh and GMU.

If you have a few poor grades, really lack strong LORs and are dead set on a top placement the regular MSc is the right call.

chrishacker
11-22-2012, 01:58 PM
Best preparation for admission and passing first year would be the regular MSc., the other MSc would be more useful later on. It's a trade-off that only you can decide.

Are you good at math and already have great grades and LORs from undergrad? If so, you can probably afford to take the behavioral program and still do well when it comes to admission. You should be looking at targeting programs at Duke, CMU (their social decision sciences program), Caltech, Ohio State, and NYU for experimental and behavioral stuff. Lower ranked programs strong in experiments include Pittsburgh and GMU.

If you have a few poor grades, really lack strong LORs and are dead set on a top placement the regular MSc is the right call.

Well, thanks. I have decided to take the regular MA.
In additional to calculus, linear algebra and probability, I took abstract algebra, Lebesgue integral, mathematical modeling and Bayesian inference in my undergraduate, so I think that mathematics will be OK for a US Phd program ranked around 50. The real problems are the LORs and my economic courses...I can't find anyone known in western countries for my LOR (I am international), and my undergraduate program only provides one course on micro, macro and metrics, respectively. The level is thought to be between intro and intermediate. We can't take the grad-school courses, so that's nothing we can do. But we are required to take accounting on both intro and intermediate level, and a lot more courses on management. We take things like 'urban economics', too, but it's of little use in applying...

tm_member
11-23-2012, 04:14 PM
Well, thanks. I have decided to take the regular MA.
In additional to calculus, linear algebra and probability, I took abstract algebra, Lebesgue integral, mathematical modeling and Bayesian inference in my undergraduate, so I think that mathematics will be OK for a US Phd program ranked around 50. The real problems are the LORs and my economic courses...I can't find anyone known in western countries for my LOR (I am international), and my undergraduate program only provides one course on micro, macro and metrics, respectively. The level is thought to be between intro and intermediate. We can't take the grad-school courses, so that's nothing we can do. But we are required to take accounting on both intro and intermediate level, and a lot more courses on management. We take things like 'urban economics', too, but it's of little use in applying...


You made the right call with the regular MSc... but I would say given your math background you could afford to take the other MSc and still do okay ... so apply to both if possible.