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finchleypark
01-05-2014, 10:59 PM
I have already applied to a handful of American M.S. programs in ag econ - UC Davis, MSU, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, Univ of Maryland, UIUC and Purdue. These appear to be a good fit to my research interests - applied microeconomics/international development. Ultimately I would like to aim for an ARE PhD in top 15-20 universities (mostly US), so I wonder whether there is any ARE program in Europe that can help me achieve this. The only schools I have come across are University of Copenhagen and some swedish school of ag sciences but I have no information whatsoever about their placement record. anyone?

envirodevonomic
01-05-2014, 11:08 PM
Check out UCL's MSc Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment. I don't actually know anything about this programme other than that it was launched quite recently. I don't know what topics in ARE you're interested in, but you might be able to get what you want out of it, and UCL certainly has a great standard econ program, should you want to take electives in the econ department (and should that be allowed - again, I don't know much about this program).

MSc in Economics and Policy of Energy and the Environment (http://www.bartlett.ucl.ac.uk/energy/programmes/postgraduate/msc-economics-policy-energy-environment)

pch
01-05-2014, 11:36 PM
Check out Wageningen University, they have an excellent reputation in Europe.

ms484
01-06-2014, 03:38 AM
In a certain sense ARE programs do not exist in Europe. They are the product of federal land grants to universities in the United States, thereby splintering the economics department to create a department focused solely on agricultural issues. I am sure there are masters programs in Europe that are good in the sub fields you are interested in, but it would not be the same. I don't really know about any European programs, although a colleague of mine at wisconsin who is in the phd program came out of a LSE masters. I think if are is your dream you should go to a straight Econ masters in Europe if you want to leave the states.

sulebrahim
01-06-2014, 04:24 AM
I know school of Agricultural Policy and Development of the University of Reading in UK has various ARE masters program, while the Land Economy program at Cambridge is more of a real estate and urban econ program
But I agree with MS484, I don't know how beneficial ARE masters in EU programs will be, especially if they haven't sent many people to the US.
Since you are trying to get to a top 10 ARE schools for PhD in the US, getting into one of the schools on your list, should set you up nicely.

finchleypark
01-06-2014, 01:43 PM
do you happen to know anything of the 2-year European Master in Agricultural, Food and Environmental Policy Analysis?
Erasmus Mundus - Action 1 - Erasmus Mundus Masters Courses (EMMCs) | EACEA (http://eacea.ec.europa.eu/erasmus_mundus/results_compendia/selected_projects_action_1_master_courses_en.php)

I'm sure this degree would be great for someone planning to do a PhD in Europe but probably not so much US?
any thoughts would be appreciated.

@sulebrahim: you're definitely right, getting into one of the US ARE programs I have applied to would be ideal but it's just a handful and now I am not sure about my chances. So I have started looking around for more :)) ...

finchleypark
01-06-2014, 08:58 PM
Since you are trying to get to a top 10 ARE schools for PhD in the US, getting into one of the schools on your list, should set you up nicely.

I know that and hope to get in! but what if not? :)

Has anyone heard of the European Master in Agricultural, Food and Environmental Policy Analysis?
UCL - Programme structure (http://www.uclouvain.be/287361.html)

finchleypark
01-07-2014, 08:17 AM
What about the European masters of agricultural, food and environmental policy analysis? It seems that it's organised by 5 european countries and one gets to study in 2 or 3 countries... Not sure about its reputation though. Any thoughts?

ColonelForbin
01-07-2014, 03:44 PM
Fichley that seems to me more like a terminal masters degree. I doubt a degree like that will help you get a hand up at ARE Ph.D. admission process you foresee in the future. What you want to avoid is masters which make you a jack of all trades and master of none. While these masters may be the ones that seem the most interesting, they are also the ones that carry very little clout in the economics world, because, let's face it, economics focuses heavily on super-specialization at a Ph.D. level.

If you want to do an ARE Ph.D. and are dying to do a masters overseas I highly recommend doing an economics masters (or at least something quantitative or scientific in nature). Your Ph.D. admissions are going to be much more dependent on being "tooled" up as opposed to getting specialized information in your subfield of economics.

you mention applied micro and international development -- can you be more specific about what you want to research? Because frankly -- you do not need to attend a ARE program to do research at that intersection. Now if you want applied micro/int'l development with a ag or environmental bent, then ARE is probably the place to be. Please clarify this as it'll help us understand what you ultimate goals are.

EnvEcon
01-17-2014, 07:21 PM
If you want to do an ARE Ph.D. and are dying to do a masters overseas I highly recommend doing an economics masters (or at least something quantitative or scientific in nature). Your Ph.D. admissions are going to be much more dependent on being "tooled" up as opposed to getting specialized information in your subfield of economics.


I totally second this. As far as I remember, in my program all the people from Europe had a master in economics or engeneering. None had a master in ag econ. On the other hand, we had one person that got in with a ag econ master from UC Davis, but even that was not the canonical route that most people take.

The other point is that the European ag econ department are much, much more specialized towards agriculture than the Phd programs you are targeting. Top US Ag econ departments are doing less and less "pure ag" and more and more resource/environmental/micro development, depending on the specific strength of the department. The risk is that you find yourself stuck with a very narrow specialization which is not even proved effective in getting into an ARE Phd.