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View Full Version : Your thoughts on mathematicians willing to jump into economics



fake22
11-24-2014, 08:48 PM
I have heard and read a lot about how important are math courses when it comes to a PhD in Economics. But I am wondering what would be the best strategy for a mathematician who is particularly interested in Econometrics. Should I spend time on proving that I will do well in courses where it takes more than just math? Will that be a concern of the committee? Or is it better to concentrate on my potential strength in Econometrics and try to convince the committee that I am a good candidate.
I was good at the few courses on Econometrics I took. Not too much in Micro and Macro.

Thanks!

econ girl
11-25-2014, 12:01 AM
I'm taking a graduate econometrics course right now, and I think my math background has mattered far more than micro/macro. I wouldn't worry too much.

tm_member
11-25-2014, 12:47 AM
I have heard and read a lot about how important are math courses when it comes to a PhD in Economics. But I am wondering what would be the best strategy for a mathematician who is particularly interested in Econometrics. Should I spend time on proving that I will do well in courses where it takes more than just math? Will that be a concern of the committee? Or is it better to concentrate on my potential strength in Econometrics and try to convince the committee that I am a good candidate.
I was good at the few courses on Econometrics I took. Not too much in Micro and Macro.

Thanks!

Just a warning, if you are just good at metrics and have no interest in, or aptitude for, economics itself then a PhD in applied statistics will be much more relevant and interesting for you.

No department wants someone who is only great at developing new estimators or tests that have no economic relevance. Moreover, even an econometrics professor would be expected to teach economics classes now and then and to really know what they were teaching and how it matters for debates in the economics literature.

fake22
11-25-2014, 03:29 AM
Just a warning, if you are just good at metrics and have no interest in, or aptitude for, economics itself then a PhD in applied statistics will be much more relevant and interesting for you.

No department wants someone who is only great at developing new estimators or tests that have no economic relevance. Moreover, even an econometrics professor would be expected to teach economics classes now and then and to really know what they were teaching and how it matters for debates in the economics literature.


That's a great advice. I have given that some thinking already. But I am sure I am very interested in the whole package. I am aware also of the fact that been interested doesn't make me good,I wouldn't consider myself special when it comes to the rest of economics but I am sure I would be good enough. Nevertheless I know If I have the chance to impress someone It would be with econometrics. I have to find the field where I can use the econometrics, right now I am enthusiastic about Industrial Organization and Networks but I would lie if I say I know a lot about it.

My concern is about the best way to sell myself.

Thanks!

fake22
11-25-2014, 03:43 AM
I'm taking a graduate econometrics course right now, and I think my math background has mattered far more than micro/macro. I wouldn't worry too much.

Thank you! I am trying not to worry. One sees a lot of very talented people around here that I understand every detail will be needed to achieve the goal.