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PhDPolEcon
12-28-2014, 08:27 PM
Hello,

I am trying to find admisison statistsics for top 20 programs: Number of applicants, number admitted, number enrolled.M

any schools will state statistics in this form: "We received 700 applications and admitted 30". What is not clear is if 30 is the number of amdits or those who enrolled.

I suggest that those who have access to these statistics just post it in this thread in the form of:

School
# of Applicants:
# of Admits
# of Enrolled Students
Data as of Year XXXX

This thread could then serve as a reference to all.

Thanks.

Food4Thought
12-28-2014, 08:36 PM
Duke is one of the only schools I know which posts detailed admissions statistics: http://gradschool.duke.edu/about/statistics/economics-phd-admissions-and-enrollment-statistics

publicaffairsny
12-28-2014, 09:10 PM
If the school says 30 admits it means they gave out 30 offers and probably about 10 accepted.

fakeo
12-28-2014, 09:42 PM
This is really something you can easily find out by visiting departmental websites (if the information is published by the school). Luckily for you, I have created a file with data like this some months ago. The source of the information is departmental websites. Accuracy not guaranteed. Link (https://www.sendspace.com/file/2mp29y).

PhDPolEcon
12-28-2014, 10:56 PM
Many thanks fakeo!

Yes, this is on a lot of the websites, but as you have seen, many websites do not fully disclose the number of offers. Your very useful spreadsheet had the same issue I found in many schools - the number of offers is not clearly disclosed, just the number of admits - which appears to actually be the number of those who enrolled. So for example it psafe to guess that 20 people enrolled in Ohio State, but since they did not have a100% yield the actual number of offers is much higher. That number (# of offers) is what is a mystery to me for many schools.

My hunch is that the number of offers is roughly twice the number of enrolled students. Do others agree with this rough rule of thumb?

Thanks again fakeo for sharing your spreadsheet!!!

PhDPolEcon
12-28-2014, 11:01 PM
This is one of the many things I like about Duke. Very transparent.

publicaffairsny
12-28-2014, 11:21 PM
In this study of students entering in 2002, the average first year cohort size (those accepting offers) was 26.5. Seems large to me, but thats the range you should be looking for. An Admit number should probably be 2 or three times larger than that, and the actual cohort will probably be a good deal smaller. I think big name programs tend to have larger cohorts because they have more resources. If 1000 econ phds are awarded each year and this study finds a 60% completion rate, we should be seeing about 1700 admits a year. There are 75 ranked programs and about 50 unranked. So we should be looking at a mean cohort size around 14.

https://www.aeaweb.org/aea/2011conference/program/retrieve.php?pdfid=156

Food4Thought
12-28-2014, 11:45 PM
This is one of the many things I like about Duke. Very transparent.

Yes, transparency is good until one receive a rejection letter which says, "You were rejected not because there were many qualified candidates, but because we did not see you excelling in our program."

jrdonsimoni
12-29-2014, 12:10 AM
I made this file last autumn for my applications for 2014 entry, data is up to date as of January 2014.

It's got the universities from the US News ranking, Top 80. and I added Repec rankings for Behavioural and experimental cause thats what I was interested in. Overall it's just a file I put together to keep track of my applications and LOR writers, but the Rankings tab should still prove useful, though some minor updating might be needed. Note the fees are from an international student's perspective (being French).

Hope it helps:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_v2nQp8R5JoT0k0NEVoWm1RZ1E/edit
(https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B_v2nQp8R5JoT0k0NEVoWm1RZ1E/edit)

anon9292
12-29-2014, 12:18 AM
^ This file is awesome.

I see this is based on data from Urch. I wonder if the average GPA of posters here is higher or lower than average. Are people that come to Urch more on top of their stuff (==> higher GPA) or are more concerned about their prospects (==> lower GPA)?

PhDPolEcon
12-29-2014, 12:19 AM
Thanks so much! Very helpful file! You are quite organized. I hope you were successful!

publicaffairsny
12-29-2014, 01:02 AM
I'm really shocked at the 20% admit rate (according to that file) at certain top 20 programs including chicago. With those chances how can you not get in?

PhDPlease
12-29-2014, 02:24 AM
I think Chicago gives a high # of unfunded offers, which for many people is basically equivalent to a rejection. It would also be interesting to know whether the places w/unexpectedly high admissions rates are bc they give a lot of unfunded offers but are not so much easier to get a funded offer from, or it is also easy to get a funded offer.

Food4Thought
12-29-2014, 02:25 AM
I think Chicago gives a high # of unfunded offers, which for many people is basically equivalent to a rejection. It would also be interesting to know whether the places w/unexpectedly high admissions rates are bc they give a lot of unfunded offers but are not so much easier to get a funded offer from, or it is also easy to get a funded offer.

Wisconsin is notorious for handing out unfunded offers like nobody's business.

publicaffairsny
12-29-2014, 02:34 AM
Is it a public thing? Among top 20's Minnesota, UCLA, UCSD, UT Austin and UMD College Park are outliers with admissions rates close to 20% or higher.

PhDPlease
12-29-2014, 02:37 AM
I would say that *on average* public universities might be more likely to hand out unfunded offers and/or be reliant on grad students to provide a significant amount of teaching, relative to private unis, which often have more $$ and while might not be reliant on grad students as cheap labor. But that is just my speculation that this might be true on average, of course with there being universities that are exceptions to this as well.

publicaffairsny
12-29-2014, 04:09 AM
Yeah, there is a clear relationship in this data. public top 20's have admissions rates twice that of private, with the exception of berkeley.

fakeo
12-29-2014, 08:29 AM
My hunch is that the number of offers is roughly twice the number of enrolled students. Do others agree with this rough rule of thumb?

In my file, the average offers-to-enrolled students ratio is 3.43, but the data is only available for 9 schools. :( In the file of @jrdonsimoni (awesome share btw) it's 3.37 (n=19).
I'm also surprised by the high admission rates at some schools. I originally also had a 20% admission rate for Chicago in my file. Then I checked the website today and updated the spreadsheet. Now they have different figures.

I also find it interesting how much the the number of applicants can vary among similarly ranked schools. Seems like these numbers can be fugded quite a bit?

jrdonsimoni
12-29-2014, 02:39 PM
Yeah do fee lfree to update the figures when the schools have updated their website. I spent a lot of time cruising their websites looking for the data, and sometimes I had to piece it together from various locations.

I also used averages sometimes (say when there were 5 years available), since I didn't have a full panel for all the observations.