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Economics4Life
02-17-2015, 10:21 PM
Guys, I really need your help on this!

I have to use Nechyba's Book Micro with Calculus for my course (along with Nicholson's Microeconomic Theory) but this guy made a very confused subdivision of the content as you can see... Can someone help me match the content of the two books (I mean, the things by Nechyba in Nicholson's one)? I'll leave below the Table of Content of Nechyba's and then Nicholson. Thank you so much (and I really mean it)!!!!

Chapter 1: Introduction.
PART 1: Utility-Maximizing Choice: Consumers,Workers, and Savers.
Chapter 2: A Consumer’s Economic Circumstances.
Chapter 3: Economic Circumstances in Labor and Financial Markets.
Chapter 4: Tastes and Indifference Curves.
Chapter 5: Different Types of Tastes.
Chapter 6: Doing the “Best” We Can.
Chapter 7: Income and Substitution Effects in Consumer Goods Markets.
Chapter 8: Wealth and Substitution Effects in Labor and Capital Markets.
Chapter 9: Demand for Goods and Supply of Labor and Capital.
Chapter 10: Consumer Surplus and Deadweight Loss.
PART 2: Profit-Maximizing Choice: Producers (or “Firms”).
Chapter 11: One Input and One Output: A Short-Run Producer Model.
Chapter 12: Production with Multiple Inputs.
Chapter 13: Production Decisions in the Short and Long Run.
PART 3: Competitive Markets and the “Invisible Hand”.
Chapter 14: Competitive Market Equilibrium.
Chapter 15: The “Invisible Hand” and the First Welfare Theorem.
Chapter 16: General Equilibrium.
Chapter 17: Choice and Markets in the Presence of Risk.
PART 4: Distortions of the “Invisible Hand” in Competitive Markets.
Chapter 18: Elasticities, Price-Distorting Policies, and Non-Price Rationing.
Chapter 19: Distortionary Taxes and Subsidies.
Chapter 20: Prices and Distortions across Markets.
Chapter 21: Externalities in Competitive Markets.
Chapter 22: Asymmetric Information in Competitive Markets.
PART 5: Distortions of the “Invisible Hand” from Strategic Decisions.
Chapter 23: Monopoly.
Chapter 24: Strategic Thinking and Game Theory.
Chapter 25: Oligopoly.
Chapter 26: Product Differentiation and Innovation in Markets.
Chapter 27: Public Goods.
Chapter 28: Governments and Politics.
PART 6: Considering How to Make the World a Better Place.
Chapter 29: What Is Good? Challenges from Psychology and Philosophy.
Chapter 30: Balancing Government, Civil Society, and Markets.

Part I: INTRODUCTION.
1. Economic Models.
2. Mathematics for Microeconomics.
Part II: CHOICE AND DEMAND.
3. Preferences and Utility.
4. Utility Maximization and Choice.
5. Income and Substitution Effects.
6. Demand Relationships among Goods.
Part III: UNCERTAINTY AND STRATEGY.
7. Uncertainty.
8. Game Theory.
Part IV: PRODUCTION AND SUPPLY.
9. Production Functions.
10. Cost Functions.
11. Profit Maximization.
Part V: COMPETITIVE MARKETS.
12. The Partial Equilibrium Competitive Model.
13. General Equilibrium and Welfare.
Part VI: MARKET POWER.
14. Monopoly.
15. Imperfect Competition.
Part VII: PRICING IN INPUT MARKETS.
16. Labor Markets.
17. Capital and Time.
Part VIII: MARKET FAILURE.
18. Asymmetric Information.
19. Externalities and Public Goods.

Zubrus
02-17-2015, 10:26 PM
Even if we know the table of contents, without reading each book, how are we supposed to accurately match the contents between the two books? Look at the back of each book (glossary) and then match the contents.

Economics4Life
02-17-2015, 10:37 PM
Even if we know the table of contents, without reading each book, how are we supposed to accurately match the contents between the two books? Look at the back of each book (glossary) and then match the contents.

Just your best guess would be awesome! Without putting much thought into this...Just looking the best association that come up!

Food4Thought
02-18-2015, 12:55 AM
without giving it much thought? Ok.

I don't know why your professor would have you read two intermediate micro textbooks. Just skim the pages of both. Find the author whose writing you like better, and throw the other one out.

chateauheart
02-18-2015, 04:21 AM
Reading two explanations of the same idea and seeing where they are equivalent is actually a really good way to learn the formal material. And seeing where they aren't equivalent is really a good way to figure out potential research questions. So in addition to the standard response that this is not a homework-help site, this is really something you would benefit from figuring out on your own.

Econhead
02-18-2015, 01:32 PM
Reading two explanations of the same idea and seeing where they are equivalent is actually a really good way to learn the formal material. And seeing where they aren't equivalent is really a good way to figure out potential research questions. So in addition to the standard response that this is not a homework-help site, this is really something you would benefit from figuring out on your own.

Along these same lines: It'd be quite surprising (at least to me) if you (the OP, not Chateu) didn't end up using more than one textbook (that covers the same material) for many of your classes. Many micro Ph. D courses use MWG, but suggest that students pick up a copy of Varian for sections that confuse them. That's seems comparable to what is being done here, just at a lower level.

I haven't sold most of my textbooks back because I prefer to look back-even at simple material-when I get a brain fart. I do this even more with anything math related. For such topics that require a greater level of intuition than brute-force math, such as game theory, I recommend having more than one textbook (especially for uncommon games that aren't intuitive at first glance).

Although I find that my fellow graduate students tend to use fewer textbooks than I do, it has been invaluable for me, and something that many of my professors have always recommended.