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View Full Version : What is a good score?



darklighter2930
12-06-2004, 09:40 AM
Im a college Freshman intrested in becoming a Lawyer. Right now I am "doubled up" on most of my classes and will graduate with a BS about a year maybe a year in a half before the standard four year time period it takes. I just took a practice LSAT not knowing what was on it or knowing what is was about (just knowing I needed to take it) and I got a 144 on it. Most college I see that offer Law require score ranging from 155 to 170, is 144 really that bad or is it just the average?:eek:

Dragonfinity
02-09-2005, 08:28 PM
144 won't get you into anywhere worth going to (at least if you want to get a decent job), but it is a very good start. My first practice exam (with no studying prior) was somewhere around there, and I got a 167. Most people that I know improve dramatically from studying for this exam. Mostly because the time pressures are significantly more than other standardized tests. I would think you could score over 160 with effort, and that will get you into a choice of good schools.

Elletiger
03-15-2005, 06:28 PM
Yea 144 is total crap. (No offense) But you are only a freshman, so you have plenty of time. I started studying summer after my sophomore year. I think that has a lot to do with a high score- how much time you are willing to put into studying.

If you want to go anywhere in the top 20, you should seriously consider taking a prep course. They are well worth the money. I went from a 154 (my first "official" non official test) to a 169 with TestMasters (www.testmasters180.com (http://www.testmasters180.com/)), and everyone I know did very well going through them. All of the instructors are 95th percentile and above-- unlike Kaplan, where a homeless man off the street who's never taken the LSAT can teach a class.

LaLa101
05-16-2005, 02:42 AM
get over 160 if you want a chance

japper88
05-20-2005, 04:24 AM
Figure out what tier law school you want to go to. Ivy league level schools are in the 170+ range. Top 50 schools are usually 165+. However so many people are applying to law school now, that in order to get a shot at any decent law school you probably do have to be in the 160+ range. You should check out princetonreview.com, they have some more information about law school, and the gpa and lsat ranges for most US law schools.

Dragonfinity
05-20-2005, 02:15 PM
I doubt Top 50 schools require 165. In fact, I know they don't. University of Georgia's average class last year had a 163. They are around 25 to 30, I believe. Top 10 will definitely require that score, and maybe even Top 20 nowadays. In my day (10 years ago), 165 would easily get you into a Top 20 school. Anyway, clearing 160 is always a good idea if you have your eye set on a very good school. Still, there are many good schools that you can get into with high 150's. Shoot for a minimum of 155 is you want to be assured admission somewhere, otherwise you may be scraping the bottom of the barrel.

C

rsieg10
08-04-2005, 03:24 PM
I'm in agreement with a few of the other posters who stated that a 144 is "crap". However, you're only a freshman and you still have time. I am taking the LSAT next summer and have just begun studying. A 144 will probably get you in somewhere, but I'd sure hate to see where. To get in a top law school (top 10), you will need a 170+. A top 25 school might require at least a 160. Scores range from 120-180, with an average score of 150. Buy a Kaplan or Princeton Review LSAT study book and spend the next few months going through that, then the semester before you take the LSAT (probably the 2nd semester of your junior year), take a Princeton Review or Kaplan classroom course. I've heard they help greatly; it certainly can't hurt. I know people whose scores have jumped 20 points from the first practice test to the last--putting themselves in a COMPLETELY higher tier of law schools.

Minaelle
09-28-2006, 09:02 AM
Yea 144 is total crap. (No offense) But you are only a freshman, so you have plenty of time. I started studying summer after my sophomore year. I think that has a lot to do with a high score- how much time you are willing to put into studying.

If you want to go anywhere in the top 20, you should seriously consider taking a prep course. They are well worth the money. I went from a 154 (my first "official" non official test) to a 169 with TestMasters (www.testmasters180.com (http://www.testmasters180.com/)), and everyone I know did very well going through them. All of the instructors are 95th percentile and above-- unlike Kaplan, where a homeless man off the street who's never taken the LSAT can teach a class.
Hey thanks for the recommendation to test masters. I thought Kaplan was going to be decent since someone recommended it to me a few weeks ago. Are you for real that Kaplan is that bad!? I was even going to pay for tutoring!!!! Anyway, just wanted to send you my thanks.

Minaelle
09-28-2006, 09:02 AM
By the way...I heard test prep courses are good, but who's scored high on the LSAT without it? Anyone?

pammons
06-13-2008, 03:15 PM
yeah 144 is no good. I am graduating early too and some schools will give you a little extra admissions boost for that. However you're gonig to need to buckle down and study I took a kaplan diagnostic (practice) test freshman year and got a 153... I haven't been too diligent with studying and have only been able to improve by 10 points or so.

I was talking to UT Laws admin officer and he warned me that everyone needs to shoot for higher scores than are the school's median. (you know the number that comes up in the schools profile) He said that since the economy is bad, people want to go to grad school rather than try to find a job... that means more competition so everyone needs to step up their game and scores if they want to get into a particular school.

As far as programs go, I couldnt take any for time and money reasons, but books work for me and I am making the grades I want. From what I know if you want to make better than 144 Kaplan's fine, get them with a coupon/deal however if you want to make a practically perfect score, then Powerscore or Testmaster seems to be the consensus. But mainly just get a whole bunch of practice tests and go to town.

Good luck Kiddo.

do_not_pass_go
07-19-2008, 08:24 PM
The original poster posted this in 2004. If his plan worked he is already in law school...

Also, http://www.lsat.com/pdfs/2007-2008/LegalEducationStatistics.pdf (page 5) isn't showing any increase in applicants, but an increase in enrollment. I am not sure if the economy is encouraging people to GO to law school, but it doesn't look like it is encouraging people to APPLY to law school. The 08-09 isn't out yet, but maybe the admissions guy will be shown correct when it is released.


yeah 144 is no good. I am graduating early too and some schools will give you a little extra admissions boost for that. However you're gonig to need to buckle down and study I took a kaplan diagnostic (practice) test freshman year and got a 153... I haven't been too diligent with studying and have only been able to improve by 10 points or so.

I was talking to UT Laws admin officer and he warned me that everyone needs to shoot for higher scores than are the school's median. (you know the number that comes up in the schools profile) He said that since the economy is bad, people want to go to grad school rather than try to find a job... that means more competition so everyone needs to step up their game and scores if they want to get into a particular school.

As far as programs go, I couldnt take any for time and money reasons, but books work for me and I am making the grades I want. From what I know if you want to make better than 144 Kaplan's fine, get them with a coupon/deal however if you want to make a practically perfect score, then Powerscore or Testmaster seems to be the consensus. But mainly just get a whole bunch of practice tests and go to town.

Good luck Kiddo.