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khadija
11-19-2006, 10:43 PM
could you tell me if these second messengeres have a same fonction no matter which tissu they belong, or it depends on the tissu where they excist.
thanks

khadija
11-20-2006, 11:46 AM
could you tell me if these second messengeres have a same fonction no matter which tissu they belong, or it depends on the tissu where they excist.
thanks


no body can answer my question??:( :( please just try

lite
11-20-2006, 03:07 PM
dear khadija
i`m pretty sure about ip3 that`ll have the same function where ever it was but not sure about the 1st two .. please correct if wrong freinds

bva
11-20-2006, 03:29 PM
Ok, i will try...:hmm: Nope, sorry still can't.

Check this link for cAMP, it should answer your question.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclic_adenosine_monophosphate

[B]Guanosine monophosphate, also known as 5'-guanidylic acid or guanylic acid and abbreviated GMP, is a nucleotide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucleotide) that is found in RNA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNA). It is an ester (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ester) of phosphoric acid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphoric_acid) with the nucleoside (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucleoside) guanosine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanosine). GMP consists of the phosphate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphate) group (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_group), the pentose (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentose) sugar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar) ribose (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribose), and the nucleobase (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nucleobase) guanine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guanine).
The sodium salt, disodium guanylate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disodium_guanylate) is a food additive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_additive) used as a flavor enhancer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flavor_enhancer) because of its distinctive meaty taste.

Inositol trisphosphate or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (also commonly known as triphosphoinositol; abbreviated InsP3 or IP3), together with diacylglycerol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacylglycerol), is a second messenger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_messenger) molecule used in signal transduction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signal_transduction) in biological cells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_%28biology%29). It is made by hydrolysis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrolysis) of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatidylinositol_4%2C5-bisphosphate), a phospholipid (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phospholipid) that is located in the plasma membrane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_membrane), by phospholipase (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phospholipase) C.

Its main functions are to mobilize Ca2+ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium) from storage organelles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organelle) and to regulate cell proliferation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_proliferation) and other cellular reactions. For example, in the fruit fly Drosophila (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drosophila_melanogaster), InsP3 is used for intracellular transduction of light recognition in eye (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eye) cells.

The elevated intracellular concentration of one or more second messengers following binding of an external signaling molecule triggers a rapid alteration in the activity of one or more actions of cAMP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAMP).

bva
11-20-2006, 03:30 PM
http://www.maxanim.com/biochemistry/Second%20Messenger/Second%20Messenger.htm

This one is animation for second messenger.
Our friends already posted this web, but the above one is specific to second messenger as your requested.

fizzbizz
11-20-2006, 08:02 PM
could you tell me if these second messengeres have a same fonction no matter which tissu they belong, or it depends on the tissu where they excist.
thanks
In biology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biology), second messengers are low-weight diffusible (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffusion) molecules (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molecule) that are used in signal transduction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signal_transduction) to relay signals within a cell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_%28biology%29). They are synthesized or released by specific enzymatic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enzyme) reactions, usually as a result of an external signal that was received by a transmembrane receptor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmembrane_receptor) and pre-processed by other membrane-associated proteins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Membrane_protein). There are three basic types of second messenger molecules:

Hydrophobic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrophobe) molecules like diacylglycerol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacylglycerol), InsP3 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inositol_trisphosphate) and phosphatidylinositols (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatidylinositol) are membrane-associated and diffuse from the plasma membrane (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_membrane) into the juxtamembrane (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Juxtamembrane&action=edit) space where they can reach and regulate membrane-associated effector proteins.
Hydrophilic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrophile) molecules are water-soluble molecules, like cAMP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclic_AMP), cGMP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CGMP), and Ca2+ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calcium_%28second_messenger%29), that are located within the cytosol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytosol).
gases, nitric oxide (NO) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signal_transduction#Nitric_oxide_.28NO.29_as_secon d_messenger) and carbon monoxide (CO) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide), that can diffuse both through cytosol and across cellular membranes.These intracellular messengers have some properties in common:

They can be synthesized/released and broken down again in specific reactions by enzymes.
Some (like Ca2+) can be stored in special organelles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organelle) and quickly released when needed.
Their production/release and destruction can be localized, enabling the cell to limit space and time of signal activity.

fizzbizz
11-20-2006, 08:05 PM
so to sum it up..ip3 func is diff from camp and cgmp.