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View Full Version : GRE Verbal & Analytical vs. Masters in Econ



rcwlhk
12-03-2007, 05:10 PM
Hi all,

I've read some threads posted on this board regarding the requirements for the GRE Verbal & Analytical, and as well as some of the profiles of people who were successfully admitted into top PhD programs.

I only have approximately a month remaining before taking the GRE; I've started practicing (on and off) the GRE about a month ago, but almost 90% of my focus had been in the Quantitative section.

With the short amount of time remaining, what do you think my best strategy is? In another words, what kind of verbal scores do I really need to get into a good masters in econ program (esp. in the UK?). I'd much rather spend more time practicing math than memorizing vocabulary; but I do want to maximize my chances of admission.

Thanks a lot! I look forward to your replies.

PS. I know for LSE MSc Econ and/or EME, they require a 5.0 or above on the Analytical (as stated on website).

PS2. I studied in a Canadian university and although my mother tongue is not English, but I've been living in Canada long enough to have decent English skills that can match a native speaker. Can I even play this to my advantage? Just insist / claim that my mother tongue is NOT English and hence they might be more lenient on me on the GRE Verbal? (I'm not expecting the need to take the TOEFL).

polkaparty
12-03-2007, 07:00 PM
I know for LSE MSc Econ and/or EME, they require a 5.0 or above on the Analytical (as stated on website).

Do you have a link for this? I hadn't seen this requirement before. As much as we've bashed the UCLA app in the past week or so, the LSE website and application process in general is by far the most confusing I think...their info on the website is just scattered everywhere.

Re: GRE study, just do as many practice tests as possible. There are a few previous threads you can find with more advice. I didn't study for the verbal or writing at all so I have no advice for you there.

rcwlhk
12-04-2007, 10:02 AM
Hey polkaparty,

Here's the link and quote for the LSE Analytical requirement

MSc Econ (1-yr)
MSc Economics MSc Economics (Research) MSc Economics (Two-year programme) - Taught programmes - Graduate Prospectus - Graduate Admissions - LSE (http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/graduateProspectus2008/taughtProgrammes/MScEconomics.htm)
"Typically we expect candidates to score over 760 in the quantitative section of the test. A higher score will count in your favour, but other information, such as grades and references will matter more in the overall evaluation. We recognise that if your first language is not English, the verbal test will present special difficulties and we view your score on that basis."

MSc Econ (2-yr)
MSc Economics MSc Economics (Research) MSc Economics (Two-year programme) - Taught programmes - Graduate Prospectus - Graduate Admissions - LSE (http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/graduateProspectus2008/taughtProgrammes/MScEconomics.htm)
"Typically we expect candidates to score 780 or higher in the quantitative section of the test and 5.0 or higher in the analytical section. We recognise that if the applicant's first language is not English, the verbal test will present special difficulties and we take that into account when assessing the score."

MSc EME (1-yr)
MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics (Research) MSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics (Two-year programme) - Taught programmes - Graduate Prospectus - Graduate Admissions - LSE (http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/graduateProspectus2008/taughtProgrammes/MScEconometricsAndMathematicalEconomics.htm)
"Typically we expect candidates to score over 780 in the quantitative section of the test. A higher score will count in your favour, but other information, such as grades and references will matter more in the overall evaluation. We recognise that if your first language is not English, the verbal test will present special difficulties and we view your score on that basis."

MSc EME (2-yr)
No mention of GRE score requirements.

What strikes me me as odd is how unorganized the information is presented. Namely, it is only in the MSc Economics One-Year program where they have the explicit 5.0 Analytical requirement; this makes me question and wonder how strict is this requirement enforced. As far as I can tell, Oxford and Cambridge does not have explicit Verbal or Analytical requirements either. (Of course, I reckon that a higher score cannot possibly hurt you, but I wonder what is the marginal benefit vs. marginal cost of studying to boost your Verbal and Analytical skills; marginal cost being the opportunity cost of further practicing and review of the Quantitative section).

rcwlhk
12-04-2007, 10:03 AM
Double post