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maya.arco
02-08-2008, 01:00 PM
hey guys! maybe this is not the best thread to open, but I have one question: what do you guys think about penn state? in which field it is really strong; i heard trade is one of the strongest there,no? would you prefer going to penn state or to LSE or UCL or some top EU institutions? is anybody here to share an experience, studying there?

thank you a lot for your answers!

enjoy your weekend!

asianecon
02-08-2008, 01:06 PM
I applied to penn state two years ago mainly for their IO group (which is quite strong especially in "auction econometrics"). Moreover, penn state outperforms similarly ranked schools in the job market

maya.arco
02-08-2008, 01:32 PM
thanks! are you there now or did you choose another program? IO is industrial organization or what? does anybody happen to know about dev.economics there?

thanks!

anna09
02-08-2008, 05:24 PM
thanks! are you there now or did you choose another program? IO is industrial organization or what? does anybody happen to know about dev.economics there?

thanks!


Yes, IO is industrial organization, which I have also heard PSU is extremely strong in, along with trade (basically, I've heard it's well respected for anything micro). I'm not sure about developmental. Sorry, no student experience, these are just all things I've gathered from other's experience.

Ancalagon The Black
02-08-2008, 06:01 PM
overall, how would you guys rank penn state?

AstralTraveller
02-08-2008, 07:09 PM
I would rank it as a top 20 for quality of the program and placement (their star candidates each year really do well). In my country is not a popular destination, b/c it "sounds" to most people like the poor relative to UPenn. Therefore, I would rank it as a top 30-35 in popularity.

However, they really rock on a couple of fields in Economics (I/O, microeconometrics, monetary theory), and if you are aiming to their Business School, they have nothing to be ashamed of. Smeal is a well regarded business school to pursue a PhD.

I remember the webometrics ranking (don't know where to find it now), where Penn State ranked something like top 5 of all world's universities (can't remember in what was it based, though).

I have never been to University Park, but since it seems to be in the middle of nowhere, I would go gladly to pursue my studies there: there's nothing to do except studying, so I can keep focused all 5 years ;)

In definitive, I think it is a great place to study. In fact, I applied there (Econ PhD) through Fulbright. :luck2:

pdesmmhh
02-08-2008, 11:17 PM
I am at PSU right now doing my UG, and I just spoke with a professor about taking their grad level micro sequence next year and he said that it is one of the best sequences of any grad school. He also said that Micro and Econometrics at PSU is outstanding. Also, the school is huge and offers classes in almost anything you want to take if you want to learna subject outside of econ. And FWIW, University Park is one of the nicest towns I have been to. There is plenty to do without the cost and headache of the city. I just wish I could do my Grad here.

maya.arco
02-09-2008, 09:33 AM
oh thanks for this pdesmmhh!i am mostly interested in dev. economics that is why i asked if they are kind of strong in that field...do you know anything about that?

so you would say it is a nice place to live for 5 years over there (are there any theatres, cinemas, sports fields (besides soccer fields heh), museums and stuff like this? or it is mainly nature:D?

when will the decision reach my email?????? :D(nervous)
salut!

pdesmmhh
02-09-2008, 04:32 PM
I am not sure about dev. econ, but here is their faculty directory, you can look at each member's page and see their interests and recent publications.

Department of Economics (http://econ.la.psu.edu/people/faculty_directory.html)

As far as it being a nice place to live, I love it here, you get all four seasons, there is a minor league baseball team, PSU has a 110,000 seat football (real football, not soccer) stadium and is a top 25 team most years. They also have basketball which is so so, and they host all kinds of concerts and talks. The Bsketball stadium is hosting will ferrell on monday, fergie is coming in the spring. Also, there is an auditorium on campus where they host performing arts and classical music type stuff. There is also skiing and there is some nature stuff to do as well. The only place they may be lacking is in the shopping department. But, what grad student has the money to go shopping? Anyhow, there is really a lot to do here and there isn't much crime or poverty, I guess that is why they call it Happy Valley.

veroniquaz
02-09-2008, 05:06 PM
(real football, not soccer)

As a European I feel insulted. Soccer is the real football, and actually it is no soccer, it is football. Just call your rugby something else.

YoungEconomist
02-09-2008, 05:11 PM
I was already planning on applying to Penn State next year, but the way you guys are talking about it makes me want to get admitted very bad. I am planning on specializing in IO and Econometrics.

Olm
02-09-2008, 06:26 PM
What kind of econometrics, YE? Applied or theoretical? Time series, micro, cross-section, etc.?

AstralTraveller
02-09-2008, 06:34 PM
I was already planning on applying to Penn State next year, but the way you guys are talking about it makes me want to get admitted very bad. I am planning on specializing in IO and Econometrics.

Then I find it hard to find a place as good as PSU for that. Northwestern and Chicago are great on I/O and Econometrics as well, but outside the top 10 the team of microeconometrists at PSU is hard to beat.

I'm so sad that Herman Bierens is retiring, and that Quang Vuong is on leave undefinitely. Anyway, they still have Joris Pinske and several others, so the microeconometrics department is really strong.

VGC
02-09-2008, 06:45 PM
They have also had excellent placement in game theory and auction theory (see for example Sergei Izmalkov (http://econ-www.mit.edu/faculty/?prof_id=izmalkov)at MIT). Krishna is there.

pdesmmhh
02-09-2008, 06:54 PM
I'm so sad that Herman Bierens is retiring, and that Quang Vuong is on leave undefinitely.

I think Quang Vuong is still advising though. I also know that there are a lot of faculty members that are into game theory and auctions. They just started the Center for the Study of Auctions, Procurements and Competition Policy. Here is a link Center for the Study of Auctions, Procurements and Competition Policy CAPCP (http://econ.la.psu.edu/CAPCP/index.htm)

YoungEconomist
02-09-2008, 10:32 PM
What kind of econometrics, YE? Applied or theoretical? Time series, micro, cross-section, etc.?

Applied


By the way, it always amazes me how much you all know about faculty and programs. So many times I am reading this forum and people are throwing around faculty that I've never even heard of. Shows how much I know.:p

AstralTraveller
02-10-2008, 12:23 AM
By the way, it always amazes me how much you all know about faculty and programs. So many times I am reading this forum and people are throwing around faculty that I've never even heard of. Shows how much I know.:p

If you said it because of my/our name-dropping, please note that H. Bierens is one of my heroes. Whenever he writes, he explains complex stuff as if it all was sooo very simple. One of the many guys who have made me want to be an econometrician. :notworthy

Vuong and Pinske, on their side, are among the (IMHO) many super-econometricians of the next generation ;)

But try asking me about non-econometricians (particularly, macroeconomists that haven't been awarded the Nobel Prize), and you will find out I don't have a clue :blush:

Ricardinho
02-10-2008, 12:38 AM
AstralTraveller: Have you read Bierens' book "introduction to the mathematical and statistical foundations of econometrics"? And if so, what are your opinions?

Also, could you please suggest other econometricians that are good at explaining complex material in an understandable way?

Thanks!

AstralTraveller
02-10-2008, 02:26 AM
Have you read Bierens' book "introduction to the mathematical and statistical foundations of econometrics"? And if so, what are your opinions?

Yes, and I like it. I have never owned a copy though (borrowed it from library). I wish I had learnt the same materials from that book than Spanos's "Statistical Foundations of Econometric Modelling", which is the standard Prob. Theory book used on Econometric theory at my school. While Spanos's is very comprehensive, it is harder to grasp than Bierens's, IMHO.

Of course, it's still Probability Theory for Econometrics, so it's not *easy*, but it's a really good book, IMHO. I have learned that Econometrics, like Economics, is something that "approaches maturity" within you, after some time has elapsed. When you pick up an advanced topic for the second time, the previous subject that you need to understand it *clicks* on you.


Also, could you please suggest other econometricians that are good at explaining complex material in an understandable way?

Well, Peter Kennedy is great for understanding basic fundamentals. He makes it all look very simple, and it's great to pick up his "A guide to Econometrics" if the reader is unfamiliar with the subject, or has just one introductory course under his belt. He helps you with economic intuition.

For graduate level, I've yet to find the ideal book. Greene is great, but is not good to learn econometrics from. Davidson and Mackinnon base everything on spectral projections, so it's ideal to learn GMM from. However, there's something I don't quite like about their pedagogy that I don't know what it is.

Probably the best econometrician I know that is excellent at explaining complex material in an understandable way is my graduate econometrics professor. With him I learned to love econometrics, and he's one of my recommenders as well (so his name will remain private at least until I'm admitted).

Good luck!

Oikos-nomos
05-07-2008, 09:59 PM
As a European I feel insulted. Soccer is the real football, and actually it is no soccer, it is football. Just call your rugby something else.

Couldn't agree more!
American "Football" is to Football (Soccer) what apes are to humans.

Apparently in the past Football and Rugby were the same, but as there were some people who still wanted to be able to touch the ball with their hands, they separated into different sports. Obviously, American "Football" evolved (or involved:p) later from Rugby.

Having said that, i must admit that even though i'm a Football (Soccer) lover and regard Soccer as the real Football, i really enjoy Rugby and American Football. I find them really strategical and i consider that in them, team work is more critical than in Footbal (Soccer).

Oikos-nomos
05-07-2008, 10:14 PM
As a European I feel insulted. Soccer is the real football, and actually it is no soccer, it is football. Just call your rugby something else.

Couldn't agree more!
American "Football" is to Football (Soccer) what apes are to humans.

Apparently in the past Football and Rugby were the same, but as there were some people who still wanted to be able to touch the ball with their hands, they separated into different sports. Obviously, American "Football" evolved (or involved:p) later from Rugby.

Having said that, i must admit that even though i'm a Football (Soccer) lover and regard Soccer as the real Football, i really enjoy Rugby and American Football. I find them really strategical and i consider that in them, team work is more critical than in Footbal (Soccer).

Denver-Broncos
05-08-2008, 12:10 AM
Cheer up buckos, (veroniquaz, Oikos-nomos) there's no reason to feel insulted.

I'm an American, and American football isn't the "real" football any more than French is the "real" language. When you go to Japan, do you call a "University" a University or do you call it a Daigaku? The word Daigaku is understood by the Japanese and the other is obviously a foreign language. But this doesn't render the word University more or less "real" than Daigaku, does it? Similarly, the reference attached to the word "football" when used in the US is simply different than the reference attached to it when used elsewhere.

The one representing greater cultural relativity (and thus more empathy for other cultures) is the one with greater character here. If you're in the US, call it soccer. If you're in Europe, it's football. If you're on this forum, clarify the reference you're trying to make and move on. There is no "right" or "wrong".

econphilomath
05-08-2008, 01:12 PM
As a European I feel insulted. Soccer is the real football, and actually it is no soccer, it is football. Just call your rugby something else.

As a Latin American I feel exactly the same.... football is football and you play it with your feet.

However, we must learn to not be shocked each and every time football gets dissed in the US because it seems it will be a frequent affair.:)

Besides this started because somebody was talking about how big a stadium was, which is unchanged by what is going on in the field!

Anyway, you should have seen the italians when we had this same discussion a while ago...don't mess with those guys and their football!

By the way, I heard Penn State was admitting people now.... and I know they are famous for training top IO guys.

decisiontime
05-08-2008, 03:58 PM
By the way, I heard Penn State was admitting people now.

What do you mean econphilomath?Admitting PhD students?

econphilomath
05-08-2008, 06:48 PM
What do you mean econphilomath?Admitting PhD students?

A friend just got an offer. I'm not sure if this is generalized or a special case. I suspect the latter but who knows.

decisiontime
05-08-2008, 08:56 PM
A friend just got an offer. I'm not sure if this is generalized or a special case. I suspect the latter but who knows.

Is it a funded or non-funded offer?I remember reading that they accept applications until April 30 if an applicant does not seek funding.But if it is a funded offer then it is interesting.