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needeconhelp
02-11-2008, 11:10 PM
http://www.urch.com/forums/phd-economics/65389-those-who-have-multiple-offers.html

I personally do not have two official offers yet, but I think it is a very important to remember nevertheless. It can give others the chance to attend the institution they want. Remember, a lot of the applicants will be your co-workers/co-authors in near future.

This is how I want to play this game. As soon as I learn about final offer, including funding, of two schools, I will choose between them. I will inform the school which I do not want to attend. That way, they can give my offer to someone else right way.[clap]

I will not confirm my acceptance to the winning institution. Just in case, I get another offer from any other remaining institutions. :hmm:

If I get a new offer, again I choose between the new institutions and the winning institution from round one. And the game proceeds if fortunate enough.:tup:


If I do not get any other offers, I pick the winning instituition by April 15th.:grad:

I got my idea from Gale and Shapley: "The Stability of Marriage" part.:rolleyes:

asquare
02-11-2008, 11:28 PM
While I agree that the right thing is to turn down your other offers as soon as you've made a decision, I will make a point I made last year as well: people who have multiple offers also have difficult, important decisions to make, and they deserve respect and space to make them.

I'm not advocating feeling sorry for the "poor little rich kid" with five top-10 offers, but I also don't think it's fair to pressure people to make decisions more quickly than they are comfortable. It takes time to schedule fly outs and gather information, and people should be comfortable gathering that information and sharing ideas and impressions on TM, without feeling like they are being pushed towards making a decision for someone else's sake.

needeconhelp's "tournament" model of decision making may work for some, but not for everyone. And sometimes people really do need more information, which can only be obtained through a visit, which takes time to complete. I don't think it's fair to expect or pressure TMers who share their admissions here to make decisions following that model.

And remember that for all the admitted students who post on TM, there are many more who do not: it's highly unlikely that your future is in the hands of another TMer!

polkaparty
02-11-2008, 11:29 PM
Sigh....last year that thread got out of hand, and I'm sad to see the issue brought up again. Members of this community do not have any standing to pressure other members or create a hostile environment for them--which is precisely what that discussion did.

Furthermore, it's unlikely that the thread even had a direct impact on members of the TM community anyway (i.e., one TM member declines an offer, that offer goes to another TM member). So why risk the integrity of our forum?

I say we should congratulate those who hold multiple offers and sympathize with them as they attempt to gather all the information they need to make a life changing decision.

Julius
02-12-2008, 01:05 AM
It can give others the chance to attend the institution they want.


Is this true? What I know is that the schools give admission to much more than they can accept. That is, they already consider the fact that only small fraction of admitted students will be matriculated in the end. Also, some schools give out 'waitlisted' to resolve the uncertainty of their prediction. Given this, what is the odd on that early decline of an offer leads to saving a TMer who got rejected?

needeconhelp
02-12-2008, 05:10 AM
I might have been a little hasty. Asquare, you do reason well. All I am trying to say is that if you have more than 3-4 offers, you probably know that which institutions you are not choosing. In that case, it is only moral to let those schools know.

TM is a good source of information, but fly-outs, talking to current graduate students in person can be even more beneficial. It is a life-changing decision and we must be very careful, but not irrational.

macroeconomicus
02-12-2008, 05:29 AM
Let's not get into the issue of how many offers one has to hold and their relative ranks in order to know which institutions one is not choosing. It is possible for a strong applicant with 10 top-20 offers to be very confused, specially if ranks and funding offers are not equal. Such doubts will not be resolved until all fly-outs are over (usually end of first week of April). However, it is clear that some strong applicants who applied to a wide range of schools will end up with offers they won't be seriously considering. (e.g. to most people the choice between funded offers from schools like UCLA vs UC Irvine, or Penn vs Penn State is obvious). In those cases, it would be nice if they quickly notified their ultra-deep safety schools that they know will never be considering.

needeconhelp
02-12-2008, 05:40 AM
Do people really fly-out to 10 difference places? I think that flying-out to more than 5-6 places is a waste of time.

BTW, do all institutions have fly-outs?

macroeconomicus
02-12-2008, 05:44 AM
Practically, one might not have enough time to attend more than say 5 fly-outs, but a person with 10 or so comparable offers STILL has to take the time to decide which fly-out to attend. Also, the fly-out might change one's perspective.

Valhalla
02-12-2008, 10:31 AM
Hi needeconhelp,

It's fine if you want to obey the "rules" you describe but I think posts like yours might have negative effects on this forum... if you put people under this kind of pressure they will simply stop to reveal information... that's at least what I would do...

fp3690
02-12-2008, 11:36 AM
Hi needeconhelp,

It's fine if you want to obey the "rules" you describe but I think posts like yours might have negative effects on this forum... if you put people under this kind of pressure they will simply stop to reveal information... that's at least what I would do...

Guys, there is no "pressure". We're people who don't know each other, and probably never will in the future. Needeconhelp has a valid point, in that people with multiple offers will certainly have some they will definitely not care about. Especially the really big stars usually have 3-4 offers from top-15 places, and in this case, differences are more pronounced. If you have offers from NYU, Yale, Stanford, and UCLA, just reject UCLA and do your fellow man a favor!

econphilomath
02-12-2008, 12:23 PM
I think that after fly-outs its pretty hard to argue you are still not sure where to go (between 3+ uni's) and waiting until the last day to let universities know is just plain wrong. Those of you who are lucky enough to do well this year should be honest with yourselves and make an effort to choose in a timely fashion. Its not really about helping a fellow TMician but more about doing the right thing.

That being said, sometimes you have to wait until the last day because you are wait-listed somewhere else, or you are waiting for funding details from several places.
So in the end, all we can ask from fellow TMers is that they try and make a decision as soon as they can. Thats all we can and should do, because bothering somebody else to make a quick choice is also wrong.

Andronicus
02-12-2008, 12:25 PM
No pressure. Its only the rest of your life.

econphilomath
02-12-2008, 12:30 PM
No pressure. Its only the rest of your life.

Good point, although coming from Mr 3-0,:hmm: ....hmmm

fp3690
02-12-2008, 01:02 PM
A point on this though: Apart from the top-10, maybe even top-15, do other places have waitlists? Because if memory serves me well, apart from the infamous MIT waitlist, which is only useful for bragging rights, only a handful of top places had waitlists.

Valhalla
02-12-2008, 01:04 PM
If you have offers from NYU, Yale, Stanford, and UCLA, just reject UCLA and do your fellow man a favor!

As I am not applying to those places together with the fact that I have exams in spatial econometrics and voting theory within the next 3 days one might assume that I actually could ignore this statement and that I may invest my time more efficiently but: Do you REALLY believe that if someone receives some of the offers you mention and rejects one of them that another guy in this forum benefits from that???? How likely is that? ...

econphilomath
02-12-2008, 01:08 PM
I'll start another thread on the waitlists...

Valhalla
02-12-2008, 01:10 PM
A point on this though: Apart from the top-10, maybe even top-15, do other places have waitlists? .

I know that BC also waitlisted applicants in the previous year.

fp3690
02-12-2008, 01:31 PM
As I am not applying to those places together with the fact that I have exams in spatial econometrics and voting theory within the next 3 days one might assume that I actually could ignore this statement and that I may invest my time more efficiently but: Do you REALLY believe that if someone receives some of the offers you mention and rejects one of them that another guy in this forum benefits from that???? How likely is that? ...

I'm not saying we should do it so that another guy from the forum can gain, I'm saying it because it's a decent, courteous, solidary (I'm going for the adjective of solidarity here) thing to do, not just for fellow TMers, but for fellow applicants. I'm not implying some tutti frutti love wave, just simple things that can help everyone.

bscout
02-12-2008, 01:34 PM
Pitt and Rice also have waitlists.

ForTheWin!_08
02-12-2008, 04:13 PM
http://www.urch.com/forums/phd-economics/65389-those-who-have-multiple-offers.html
As soon as I learn about final offer, including funding, of two schools, I will choose between them. I will inform the school which I do not want to attend. That way, they can give my offer to someone else right way.



Ah, but what if one school only weakly dominates another? By making these pairwise choices, you are pruning away some branches of your decision tree, which may be individually suboptimal (since this is a nonstrategic decision problem)...

Thesus
02-12-2008, 07:48 PM
ForTheWin, I would find it hard to imagine that preferences in grad schools aren't completely transitive...

kinesis
02-12-2008, 09:25 PM
ForTheWin, I would find it hard to imagine that preferences in grad schools aren't completely transitive...

I am sorry, but I missed where ForTheWin made any point about transitivity...regardless, I actually find it easy to imagine cases where preferences for graduate schools are not transitive.

If you are only considering one factor individually, such as the emphasis a program puts on your research interest or geographical location or the ability of your significant other to come with you to a specific city or others...again, individually, yes I will agree with you that preference will probably be transitive, however the truth is that we should not consider them individually. When considering all factors together, preferences for graduate schools could conceivably become quite messy and not transitive.

It is such an important decision no one should hurry. If I get wait listed, it was the school's decision. They decided that something in my application did not deserve an immediate admission; no accepted person should feel morally responsible for the wait listed person.

My two cents, anyway...

needeconhelp
02-12-2008, 09:58 PM
Ah, but what if one school only weakly dominates another? By making these pairwise choices, you are pruning away some branches of your decision tree, which may be individually suboptimal (since this is a nonstrategic decision problem)...

Well, I assumed that you strictly prefer one school over another, because that is the only way you can make a decision at the end. Just an assumption.

Andronicus
02-13-2008, 12:47 AM
Good point, although coming from Mr 3-0,:hmm: ....hmmm

Actually, just 2 so far.