PDA

View Full Version : Gmat -> Gre



ThePho
02-18-2008, 08:56 PM
I did really well on the GMAR (780) how does this translate to a GRE score?

Namely, I just finished my GMAT how will my studying for that help me in the GRE or is it a new animal that I need to train and study for independently?

AstralTraveller
02-18-2008, 09:12 PM
I did really well on the GMAR (780) how does this translate to a GRE score?

Namely, I just finished my GMAT how will my studying for that help me in the GRE or is it a new animal that I need to train and study for independently?

Well, tell me about individual scores for Q & V, although by your overall 780 I assume it's pretty high (close to 800Q, 800V, indeed).

I prepared the GMAT for a month in April 2006. I prepared the GRE for four days in July 2007. I did well on both (better on the GMAT than the GRE). Pretty much the "residual knowledge" prevailed for the over-a-year long period I didn't do a single test for exercising. So, I wouldn't rate them as completely different animals, IMHO.

Antonio
02-18-2008, 10:42 PM
I did GMAT (640/800) in August 2006 and GRE (800Q and 540V) in May 2007.
I did not study very much for the first and I prepared myself very well for the second.
In my opinion the GRE is much easier than the GMAT.

My two cents...

fp3690
02-18-2008, 10:47 PM
Since they're both in terms of percentile, relative difficulty is really not important.

ThePho
02-18-2008, 11:06 PM
i don't want to know which one is easier. I want to know if my preparation for the GMAT, I studied December and January and got a 780/800 in February. I now want to take the GRE do I have to put in 1-2 more months of preparation or just a week or so (if studying for one correlates with the other)

Olm
02-19-2008, 12:16 AM
The math on the GMAT is supposed to be "harder", and by harder I mean data sufficiency problem difficulty > quantitative comparison problem difficulty. That's all I can say.

fp3690
02-19-2008, 12:44 AM
The math on the GMAT is supposed to be "harder", and by harder I mean data sufficiency problem difficulty > quantitative comparison problem difficulty. That's all I can say.

Yeah, that's what I heard too. GRE is also supposed to be more "difficult" in the verbal section, but that's of a smaller interest to us anyway.

Ancalagon The Black
02-19-2008, 04:56 AM
Interesting topic. I gave GMAT in June 2007 and got 700/800, AWA 6.0. I gave GRE in October 2007 and got Q770 V700 AWA 6.0. I forgot everything in between and I barely studied for the GMAT.

Incidentally, did any of you receive a letter from ETS wanting to get photocopies of GRE and GMAT results? I sent in mine and got a USD 25 gift voucher from thinkgeek !!

Ecorleone
02-19-2008, 05:00 AM
I did, but the letter got to me like two days before their deadline... never got my 25 bucks.... buuu

Olm
02-19-2008, 05:03 AM
I did, but the letter got to me like two days before their deadline... never got my 25 bucks.... buuu

owned :wallbash:

Ancalagon The Black
02-19-2008, 05:23 AM
Heh !! I bought a T shirt saying:

"Rogues do it from behind" - a corny reference to the sneak attack ability of a rogue in D&D (I am a rabid fan) and a sticker which I posted on my computer saying "Pwnd" :D

econorama
02-19-2008, 06:28 AM
Originally posted by ThePho:
I now want to take the GRE do I have to put in 1-2 more months of preparation or just a week or so (if studying for one correlates with the other)Math: The material covered on the two tests is pretty much the same. It's the type of questions that is different. For someone who got 780 on the GMAT, preparing for the Quant Comp and Charts on the GRE shouldn't be a big deal. I would recommend getting a test prep book (or at least looking one over at a library) to get an idea of what the recommended tricks are. But the best source of practice problems is the official book put out by ETS.

Verbal: You need to learn vocab. That pretty much sums it up. Again, looking through a test prep book to learn the techniques of sentence completion and analogies helps. But mainly you need to spend a little time every day studying vocabulary (if you care about your verbal score.) There are books devoted to GRE-specific vocabulary lists, and most test prep books have lists in them too. They really do use the same words over and over again; I recognized many words from lists I'd seen when I took the GRE. And of course, the best practice problems are in the official GRE book.

Writing (Yeah I know, no one really cares): Virtually identical to the GMAT. I found that the Argument topics are easier to break down and destroy on the GMAT, but it's still the same techniques. I also thought it was harder to come up with examples for the GRE Issue essay. But on the other hand, they do give you 2 essay topics to choose from on the GRE, which is nice. Since they give you more time for this essay (45 minutes as opposed to 30 on the GMAT) the essay graders are expecting something more thought out. If you feel the need to prep for the essays, every single essay topic they ever use is on ETS's website.

For reference, I took both tests. I got a 780 on the GMAT, and 800/710/5.5 on the GRE. I didn't really study the vocab because I already knew a decent chunk of it and figured that as long as I got around 700 no one would really care. I did go through a lot of the problems (both math and verbal) in the official guide.

econorama
02-19-2008, 06:37 AM
Looking over your post, I'm realising that the one thing I forgot to do was answer your question. Will you need to study for 1-2 more months? Probably not for the math, and not for the essays if you did well on the GMAT essays. If you want to do well on the verbal GRE, it's the one that's hardest to cram for because you can't memorise a few hundred words in a week. Or at least, I know I can't memorise a few hundred words in a week.

I recommend taking a practice test. Both Kaplan and Princeton Review have free ones online. See what score you get, and see how you feel about the material. How far away your target score is from your actual score will help you determine how much time you need to put into this. You may decide that you don't need to study at all, in which case you can just sign up for the test as soon as possible. I'd still recommend taking the PowerPrep tests, because they're closer to the real thing than any test company's practice tests.