Sponsored Ad:
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: LSE Economic History

  1. #1
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    4
    Rep Power
    11


    Good post? Yes | No

    LSE Economic History

    Sponsored Ad:
    I am considering applying for the MSc Economic History (Research) program at the London School of Economics and Political Science. I understand that this program is not adequate preparation for a doctorate in economics, but that is not my ultimate goal. I would ordinarily posted this thread on a history forum, but frankly I have not found them particularly useful for my area of interest.

    Has anyone attended this program? What was your experience like? What is the working relationship like with professors? Would you recommend it? Where are you now?

    Or if you have not attended the program, but have some knowledge of it - reputation of faculty in the field, etc. - I would be interested in your input as well.

    Obviously, I've scoured the website (as well as the programs at Cambridge, Edinburgh, and Oxford) for information available through the university.

    Any idea about placements for PhDs or placements of master's students?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    4
    Rep Power
    11


    Good post? Yes | No
    Anyone?

  3. #3
    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage walt526's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    15


    Good post? Yes | No
    Most people here are only interested in a MSc from LSE only to the extent that it could help improve their chances of getting into a PhD Economics program. As such, the Economic History program isn't something that is on the radar screen of the few of us on the forum who are interested in the subject, such as myself.

    The faculty of LSE has a strong reputation in economic history (although I'm not sure how many of their big names are involved in the MSc program). And it looks like a fun degree, but for my objectives (becoming a more competitive applicant to PhD Economics) it was completely useless. Frankly, I have no idea what you could do with it as a terminal degree.


    EDIT: I'm not claiming that it's a useless degree for everyone, just that I couldn't see it being useful for me.
    I'm not procrastinating. I just happen to have a very high discount rate.

  4. #4
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    4
    Rep Power
    11


    Good post? Yes | No
    I applied and got in to that program. I started a thread on it about a week ago. Someone said that they had a friend who did that program, really liked it, and is now working in Economic consultancy in Brazil.

    I guess I can't be of much help, as I stand with similar questions. As you said, you're not interested in an Economics PhD, so it might be a good option for you. The Economic History dept is one of the best in the world. It also seems like you can find good job placement in consultancy, or even development. What are you looking to do?

  5. #5
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    4
    Rep Power
    11


    Good post? Yes | No
    I was somewhat hesitant to inquire about the degree here because I assumed that it would be of little use to anyone participating in this particular forum.

    I should have made it more clear that my intent is to earn a PhD in History and not simply take the MSc as a terminal degree. The economic history programs at LSE, Oxbridge, and Edinburgh seem to be the best fit for me - as opposed to U.S./Canadian economic or history programs. Ideally, if I were admitted to the MSc program at LSE, I would intend to earn that illusive "distinction" award and stay for the PhD in Economic History. Afterwards, I would like to get a position in a history department and do some collaborative work with economists and other social scientists. None of that is particularly relevant to the discussion aside from the fact that I want a PhD and not a terminal master's degree.

    Thanks for your input! Hopefully somebody with some experience in the program will turn up somewhere on the internet. Unless I'm the only applicant next year? Those are good odds. LOL.

  6. #6
    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage walt526's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    719
    Rep Power
    15


    Good post? Yes | No
    I'd talk to a faculty member that you know whose completed a PhD History and ask them for their opinion on whether or not History adcoms are likely to look favorably on the degree. That person would have a better sense of whether or not other History professors would consider the LSE Master's useful.

    In general, from what I've observed, economic historians aren't well-respected by many "pure" economists. And I get the sense that is also true of many "pure" historians. Which is too bad, because I think that economic history could give some valuable perspective to economists, since it is not simply analysis of older data sets (as some think it is). But I've observed the (relatively speaking) ostracizing of economic historians mostly from the economic perspective, so maybe things are different with History faculty.
    I'm not procrastinating. I just happen to have a very high discount rate.

  7. #7
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    4
    Rep Power
    11


    Good post? Yes | No
    A professor in the history department at my university studies economic history so I will certainly be sure to run this by him - I have a class with him next semester. I'm incredibly aware that most economists have little respect for economic historians, but fortunately I will never be seeking a professorship in an economics department.

    Historians seem to be quite open to various perspectives and methodologies. Many historians write about labor, but also about other topics deeply ingrained in economic history (migration, natural resources, technological development, international relations, etc.). Most seem to be focused on colonization and empires. It seems likely that an economic historian would be more welcome in such an environment, but some departments might equate my economic way of thinking with a failure of morality.

    It seems as though most economic historians (in history departments) market themselves as social historians, historians of technology and science, or by whatever their geographic area of expertise. I'm interested in global economic history (see Pomerantz or similar). In one of many terrible decisions I will make in life, I will worry about employment prospects (bad for any type of historian) later on.

    For now, I'm just interested in the program experience and how well they place into PhD programs.
    Thanks for the help everyone!

  8. #8
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    7
    Rep Power
    11


    Good post? Yes | No
    Someone said that they had a friend who did that program, really liked it, and is now working in Economic consultancy in Brazil.
    My friend just graduated about a year ago and he's now working in this renowned econ consultancy in Brazil. He's also working as a teacher assistant at a prestigious econ school. However, I think the latter job is due not only to his quality, but also to his connections.
    As far as I know, the MSc Econ History is less strong in micro and macro (so you're not going through Mas-Collel), but it is supposedly very strong in econometrics. And although you're not learning the ultra-mathematical micro/macro, the "intuition" they give is very strong (let's put it this way).
    I have no idea as to how a graduate from this program would place in the US or Europe, but in Brazil I'm sure he'll do very well. LSE's brand is very strong around here.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. History of economic thought ...
    By stillhopeful in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 03-11-2011, 07:07 PM
  2. Economic history
    By dsdoodle in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 03-07-2010, 01:03 PM
  3. Stanford Economic History and Development
    By econhist in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-13-2009, 02:42 AM
  4. History of Economic Thought
    By ZomgRogged in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 10-27-2008, 05:31 AM
  5. In at LSE, Econ History vs Econ?
    By aclax2k in forum Admissions Results
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-15-2005, 08:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •