Sponsored Ad:
See the top rated post in this thread. Click here

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 50

Thread: Evaluation of Profile - Advice Appreciated

  1. #1
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    167
    Rep Power
    0


    Good post? Yes | No

    Evaluation of Profile - Advice Appreciated

    Sponsored Ad:
    Hi all:

    Recently introduced to this site and I think it does an exceptional job conveying key components to the application process and beyond; people have already been very helpful and there is great information in the FAQS, etc.

    I thought it would also be useful for me to post my profile and have people comment about it - small or large feedback is always appreciated. I also have a few small questions at the end. I will begin with posting the typical profile that is requested, though it is incomplete in some areas since I have three remaining semesters:

    Type of Undergrad: Large top 20 university with a fairly good economics department
    Undergrad GPA: 4.15/4.0
    GRE: N/A - I plan to do very well on this when I take it during the summer
    Math (and related) Courses: Calculus I-III (A+s); Math for business (A+). Classes I will be taking in the next three semesters: advanced calculus, linear algebra, proofs, probability theory, and probably one more relevant class like stochastic processes.
    Econ Courses: Principles of Micro (A); Principles of Macro (A+); Intermediate micro (A+); Healthcare economics (A); Behavioral economics (A). To be taking next semester or in upcoming: econometrics, economic development, environmental economics, intermediate macro, international trade theory, international monetary economics, and advanced macroeconomics
    Other Courses: A handful of interdisciplinary philosophy/humanities/writing classes (A's/A+'s), financial accounting (A+), managerial accounting (A), corporate finance (A), investments (A), financial markets and institutions (A+).
    Letters of Recommendation: They will be quite good
    Research Experience: Hoping to RA for a professor that I have next semester. Currently RA for an environmental public policy professor who has knowledge of economics (in the public affairs component of my school)
    Teaching Experience: Math and Economics Tutor
    Research Interests: environmental economics, macroeconomic growth, public policy
    SOP: Will be very strong
    Other: great scholarships; involved in a global finance competition

    Now: although I will apply to a lot of schools, I think my top choices would be: Oxford, Harvard, London School of Economics, and University College of London. Although I am not set against taking 4-5 years to finish the PhD, I am determined to do everything I can to finish it in 2-3 years (family friends and research indicates that this is possible under conducive circumstances). Another aspect worth mentioning: I intend on completing a masters in public affairs with a concentration in economics (top 3 university) prior to applying for a PhD. Since such a program would be two years, how should I stage letters of recommendation? Would I only want to ask my key undergraduate teachers (both of whom would are very well known) after I finish my MPA (assuming I am accepted)? Of course, I will cultivate strong relationships with professors at the school I earn an MPA at.

    Lastly, does one apply to get an NSF honorable mention? I have read a little bit about it but am unsure how it works.

    Thank you in advance for assistance!

  2. #2
    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,044
    Rep Power
    15


    Good post? Yes | No
    Unless you are a genius, there is absolutely no chance for you to finish your PhD in 2-3 years. I'm sure someone in graduate school will comment on this, but it also extremely unlikely that you will finish in 4 years. The average, as far as I've heard is 5 years. Also, I don't understand that point of getting an MPA if your going to get a PhD in Economics after, so if you can clear that up that will be great.

  3. #3
    Within my grasp! petecheese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    444
    Rep Power
    12


    Good post? Yes | No
    Quote Originally Posted by whatdoido View Post
    Unless you are a genius, there is absolutely no chance for you to finish your PhD in 2-3 years. I'm sure someone in graduate school will comment on this, but it also extremely unlikely that you will finish in 4 years. The average, as far as I've heard is 5 years. Also, I don't understand that point of getting an MPA if your going to get a PhD in Economics after, so if you can clear that up that will be great.
    Harvard PHd in 2-3 years. I would love to see that happen. Are you going to be writing up your dissertation while taking first year classes? Unless you can bend time and add hours to the day. This is extremely unfeasible.
    Also if your grades are good enough in undergrad. The MPA doesn't make sense. A masters in general wouldnt make sense for you.

  4. #4
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    167
    Rep Power
    0


    Good post? Yes | No
    Thank you.

    The MPA would be more for developing my professional skills, while the PhD is for quantitative expertise.

    As for the short duration, I appreciate hearing your perspective on it not being feasible, but that will be something that I will be able to have more control of by doing extra course work, etc.

  5. #5
    Um. What?
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    915
    Rep Power
    18


    Good post? Yes | No
    On finishing more quickly than average, see the useful discussion here:

    http://www.urch.com/forums/phd-econo...people-do.html

    Although I have known people in other fields (one in poli sci) that have finished a PhD in 3 years, I have not known anyone who has done so in Economics.

    As for MPAs - I won't speak to whether this is a good idea or not (though I'm happy to weigh in if you're looking for input). I can tell you that the most econ-ish MPA, the Kennedy School MPA/ID, has coursework that is very similar, but somewhat less tough, than the first/second year PhD Economics courses. But even the handful of graduates that go on from the MPA/ID to the PhD in economics are required to repeat the PhD Economics core and thus take 7 years in their graduate education.

  6. #6
    Um. What?
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    915
    Rep Power
    18


    Good post? Yes | No
    Also I'd be curious to hear your logic on why you are targeting Oxford, Harvard, London School of Economics, and University College of London. Some of us have some experience with the British system (I have a year's worth) and can possibly provide perspective on that choice of schools if you give your logic.

  7. #7
    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,492
    Rep Power
    18


    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful. Good post? Yes | No
    I'm unsure what you mean by "I will be able to have more control...by doing extra coursework." Coursework is not particularly what bogs you down. You have 2 years of coursework that is on a set schedule, generally (1st year core, 2nd year field classes). Once you take more upper level math (analysis, probability theory and the like), you'll have a better idea of the rigor required for PhD classes, and therefore the infeasibility of "rushing" the classwork stage of your PhD. The next 3 years are for your dissertation. There is no real excuse for trying to rush your dissertation; the quality of your dissertation (and therefore your job market paper) is what gets you a job, so rushing this stage would not benefit you in the long run. Out of curiosity, what is your ultimate goal after getting your econ PhD? Do you want to go into academics, government, NGO?

  8. #8
    Um. What?
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    915
    Rep Power
    18


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful. Good post? Yes | No
    ARE is spot on - this is my impression on the matter as well. Even if you *can* rush, it's probably not a good idea, because this is your chance to get the best training possible.

    It is also almost always the case that undergraduate and graduate level courses in economics are very different, to the point of the subject seeming almost unrecognizable in graduate form to those who've only seen it at undergrad. I wouldn't assume that you can handle PhD level econ at an accelerated pace if you've only taken undergrad econ thus far.

  9. #9
    An Urch Guru Pundit Swami Sage
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,044
    Rep Power
    15


    Good post? Yes | No
    Quote Originally Posted by thewhiterabbit View Post
    Also I'd be curious to hear your logic on why you are targeting Oxford, Harvard, London School of Economics, and University College of London. Some of us have some experience with the British system (I have a year's worth) and can possibly provide perspective on that choice of schools if you give your logic.
    This is what I was curious about. It seems a little odd that you are targeting schools these schools.

    Also, you should speak to your professors about your ideas on whether or not you can finish a PhD in 2 years. I can almost certainly guarantee you that your professors will say that it is impossible for you to do that.

    The best thing you can do right now is to search around the forum and get an idea of what kind of person a PhD is really for. You can also look around to see exactly what a Harvard acceptance profile looks like.

    PS: How do you have a 4.15/4?
    Last edited by whatdoido; 12-12-2010 at 07:40 PM. Reason: Didn't see you had 3 remaining semesters

  10. #10
    Burger King Lounge econm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    149
    Rep Power
    10


    Good post? Yes | No
    depending on your gre score and potential NSF, and that your undergrad is as good as you claim, this might be the best profile i've ever seen

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-12-2010, 07:31 PM
  2. Profile/course of action evaluation: any input appreciated
    By Cannondale in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-29-2010, 06:40 AM
  3. Profile evaluation...Please advice
    By huzun in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-11-2010, 05:50 AM
  4. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-04-2010, 11:37 PM
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-23-2006, 07:38 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •