Sponsored Ad:
See the top rated post in this thread. Click here

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Absence of math courses

  1. #1
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Absence of math courses

    Sponsored Ad:
    I am from fourth or even fifth world country (considering the courses in my BA in Econ). I have taken only one math-related course: Linear Algebra with the mix of real analysis and one probability+math-stat course in my Econ BA. So, what can I do to cover up my gaps in terms of math? I've been admitted to Europe Econ master's but there PhD-level (mathematically rigous I think)courses starts from second year, at the time of my US PhD application I would not have taken those serious courses in MA.

  2. #2
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    479
    Rep Power
    8


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    If you have not taken any proper math classes, or if your econ classes aren't mathematically rigorous, then the masters programme that you got into isn't probably very rigorous. On the off-chance that it is, it will be very difficult for you to keep up with the math used in those PhD classes.

    That being said, if the masters programme is, in fact, reputable, and you also end up doing well in the PhD first-year classes, then it should be serve as more than enough proof of mathematical ability. Therefore, you'll need those grades when you apply. This means that you shouldn't apply in the 2nd year, since those grades aren't out yet, by the time you apply.

    The best thing you can do at this point is to self-study and fill in any gaps in your math knowledge to prepare for your masters. Something like this is really the bare minimum (since it's basically just math camp) that you should know, going into any PhD course. If most of what you see there is very obvious to you, and seem somewhat basic, then you are at a decent spot, in terms of mathematical preparation. Do note that the linked YouTube video series doesn't cover point-set topology (which is usually covered in a typical real analysis class), which you'll need for micro/macro.

  3. #3
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    3
    Rep Power
    1


    0 out of 2 members found this post helpful. Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by FourthWorld View Post
    I am from fourth or even fifth world country (considering the courses in my BA in Econ). I have taken only one math-related course: Linear Algebra with the mix of real analysis and one probability+math-stat course in my Econ BA. So, what can I do to cover up my gaps in terms of math? I've been admitted to Europe Econ master's but there PhD-level (mathematically rigous I think)courses starts from second year, at the time of my US PhD application I would not have taken those serious courses in MA.
    If you are from Africa and your BS isn't called "mathematics and economics" but just economics, then your training is unlikely to be mathematically rigorous - except perhaps you have an econ master or have taken master level courses from places like ASE or the ENSAEs in the French-speaking parts.

    If your Europe econ master program is QEM or anything decent in Germany, France, Belgium, Spain, Netherlands etc, you may struggle in the econ sequence, but if you're push hard enough, you will eventually succeed. Hopefully you will maintain top grades in all of these.

    This forum prohibits people from posting links and stuff. Nonetheless, there is this online program called mathematics prep for econ PhD. It covers all the relevant math for an econ PhD and some more. This program is for outstanding econ students who have limited formal math and need to improve math skills and get transcripts for grades in the math courses to support PhD application.

    The program is organized by me with support from real math faculty who teach these math courses. It's aimed at African students who're planning to do an econ or finance PhD down the road; however, from time to time, we let others who're interested to attend for free. If you can find it online, that will benefit you a lot if you're interested. Unfortunately links can't be posted here as per forum rules.

    Over a period of 9 months, students complete at least 7 courses from
    1. Real Analysis
    2. Multivariate calculus
    3. Differential equations
    4. Linear algebra
    5. Stochastic calculus
    6. Dynamic optimization
    7. Measure-theoretic probability
    8. Mathematical statistics
    9. Network theory
    10. Functional analysis
    11. Measure theory

    If you're interested, search hard for the program. Hopefully you'll find it.

    Self-study, as the previous responder mentioned, is another gainful activity that you can embark upon.

    Good luck with your Euro master. A Euro master can be pretty nice and make up for weaknesses. I did the QEM myself many years ago. If that's the euro program you will be going for your master, then it's a good program. If I remember well, that program has placed students in Michigan, Harvard, Chicago, etc, and other euro places. If it's TSE you're going to, that's even better.

  4. #4
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Posts
    13
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    In other posts people talk about Harvard extension something. Cast a glance

  5. #5
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    If you have not taken any proper math classes, or if your econ classes aren't mathematically rigorous, then the masters programme that you got into isn't probably very rigorous. On the off-chance that it is, it will be very difficult for you to keep up with the math used in those PhD classes.
    Thanks for responding. Yeah, my BA is shotty one. But, actually, I've been admitted to several MAs which place and/or placed to US Top-5 PhDs and also I've been admitted to the couple German masters from top-5 of this country but I wouldn't consider them.

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    That being said, if the masters programme is, in fact, reputable, and you also end up doing well in the PhD first-year classes, then it should be serve as more than enough proof of mathematical ability. Therefore, you'll need those grades when you apply. This means that you shouldn't apply in the 2nd year, since those grades aren't out yet, by the time you apply.

    The best thing you can do at this point is to self-study and fill in any gaps in your math knowledge to prepare for your masters. Something like this is really the bare minimum (since it's basically just math camp) that you should know, going into any PhD course. If most of what you see there is very obvious to you, and seem somewhat basic, then you are at a decent spot, in terms of mathematical preparation. Do note that the linked YouTube video series doesn't cover point-set topology (which is usually covered in a typical real analysis class), which you'll need for micro/macro.
    Thank you for the advice. So, as I understood, I should apply for PhD after the completed MA? I have another option: to do MS in Math modelling in top russian school but I think it is waste of two years.

  6. #6
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by Taidex View Post
    If you are from Africa and your BS isn't called "mathematics and economics" but just economics, then your training is unlikely to be mathematically rigorous - except perhaps you have an econ master or have taken master level courses from places like ASE or the ENSAEs in the French-speaking parts.
    Thanks for answering. No, I am not from Africa but yes, it is the case in my country too, I mean, it is simply "economics".

  7. #7
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8
    Rep Power
    1


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful. Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    If you have not taken any proper math classes, or if your econ classes aren't mathematically rigorous, then the masters programme that you got into isn't probably very rigorous. On the off-chance that it is, it will be very difficult for you to keep up with the math used in those PhD classes.
    Thanks for responding. Yeah, my BA is not good one. But, actually, I've been admitted to several MAs which place and/or placed to US Top-5 PhDs and also I've been admitted to the couple German masters from top-5 of this country but I wouldn't consider them.

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    That being said, if the masters programme is, in fact, reputable, and you also end up doing well in the PhD first-year classes, then it should be serve as more than enough proof of mathematical ability. Therefore, you'll need those grades when you apply. This means that you shouldn't apply in the 2nd year, since those grades aren't out yet, by the time you apply.

    The best thing you can do at this point is to self-study and fill in any gaps in your math knowledge to prepare for your masters. Something like is really the bare minimum (since it's basically just math camp) that you should know, going into any PhD course. If most of what you see there is very obvious to you, and seem somewhat basic, then you are at a decent spot, in terms of mathematical preparation. Do note that the linked YouTube video series doesn't cover point-set topology (which is usually covered in a typical real analysis class), which you'll need for micro/macro.
    Thank you for the advice. So, as I understood, I should apply for PhD after the completed MA? I have another option: to do MS in Math modelling in top russian school but I think it is waste of two years.

  8. #8
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by Taidex View Post
    Good luck with your Euro master. A Euro master can be pretty nice and make up for weaknesses. I did the QEM myself many years ago. If that's the euro program you will be going for your master, then it's a good program. If I remember well, that program has placed students in Michigan, Harvard, Chicago, etc, and other euro places. If it's TSE you're going to, that's even better.
    I've been admitted to QEM but without funding. I've heard it is mainly for industry and It is hard to stay in touch with profs while you are every semester in different country

  9. #9
    Within my grasp!
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    479
    Rep Power
    8


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by FourthWorld View Post
    Thanks for responding. Yeah, my BA is not good one. But, actually, I've been admitted to several MAs which place and/or placed to US Top-5 PhDs and also I've been admitted to the couple German masters from top-5 of this country but I wouldn't consider them.


    Thank you for the advice. So, as I understood, I should apply for PhD after the completed MA? I have another option: to do MS in Math modelling in top russian school but I think it is waste of two years.

    First off, as someone mentioned above, Harvard Extension seems like a decent option but it doesn't immediate address your deficiency in math prep for even your masters. So it might be something to consider after your masters, if you got decent (but not fantastic) grades and want to bolster your math a little bit for PhD application.

    It'll be a lot more informative to list down some/all of the programmes that you got into.

    Just because you can do a math masters doesn't mean you should. If it's rigorous, and you're going in with almost no math background, you're almost guaranteed to fail; unless of course, if it's very applied. But then again, if it's applied, then there's little value in terms of PhD prep anyway.

    Just check out the linked YouTube series I posted above. That is the best way to gauge how much you actually have to make up for in preparation for your masters in the Fall.

  10. #10
    Trying to make mom and pop proud
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Posts
    8
    Rep Power
    1


    Good post? Yes | No

    Re: Absence of math courses

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    First off, as someone mentioned above, Harvard Extension seems like a decent option but it doesn't immediate address your deficiency in math prep for even your masters. So it might be something to consider after your masters, if you got decent (but not fantastic) grades and want to bolster your math a little bit for PhD application.

    Just check out the linked YouTube series I posted above. That is the best way to gauge how much you actually have to make up for in preparation for your masters in the Fall.
    I've run through some playlists on this channel and I am quite familiar with those things thanks to my dad's garage filled up with soviet math books My concern is not about my prep for master but about written proof of my math competence for PhD adcom, I mean courses like RA,DE, calc-123 courses on the undergrad transcript record . So, I am wondering how can I do that: to take GRE math, or some online courses like MIT's micromasters, harvard extension or take non-credit courses from another university? I mean, it is not as if I'm gonna write in my PhD SOP "Hey adcom guy, I haven't been taught math at university but I can explain what is isolated point and prove bolzano/weierstrass theorem to you"

    Quote Originally Posted by tutonic View Post
    Just because you can do a math masters doesn't mean you should. If it's rigorous, and you're going in with almost no math background, you're almost guaranteed to fail; unless of course, if it's very applied. But then again, if it's applied, then there's little value in terms of PhD prep anyway.
    Yeah, you are right. It is not about pure math, it is likely more applied. Here is some courses of this mater: Topics in algebra and Number theory, Topics in mathematical analysis; Mathematical modelling; Econometrics; Computational complexity theory; Discrete function theory; Calculus of variations; Computational optimization; Asymptotic methods in analysis; Intelligent system theory; Imitation and modelling; Automata theory

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-29-2011, 02:30 AM
  2. Math courses vs Econ courses next semester
    By funnycat in forum PhD in Economics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-29-2007, 02:03 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •