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poli95

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  1. Hi I am doing a degree in economics and applied maths and took a total of 14 maths and stats courses. Out of those all except for 4 are As (As in many proof based courses like functional analysis, ODEs, Complex Analysis, Real Analysis). I have Cs in PDEs, Bayesian Inference, Stochastic Processes and Stochastic Simulation. Three of those were because of poor health during prep and exams and I missed the deadline to apply for a resit. I m definitely going to retake PDEs and stochastic processes wherever I do my pre-doc/just any uni close to me that offers the course because I know that those courses are important. Do I need to retake the bayesian and stochastic simulation courses as well? I honestly can't be bothered to do it. Also what do you think about my overall profile in terms of maths prep? I have strong As in all my Econ courses. Thank you
  2. Hi I am a postgraduate student from the UK planning to apply to phd programs for 2021 entry. I am interested in time series, forecasting and empirical macroeconomics/macro-finance. Could you guys suggest which departments in US and EU top 50 (except the ones mentioned below) have good researchers in these fields? I think the following are quite good (I have excluded Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Stanford, UPenn as they are beyond my league). Not ranked in any order: - Minnesota - Northwestern - LSE - Bocconi - UCL - UCSD - UPF Thank you
  3. Hi newguyfromindia I am an MSc graduate from Warwick and can vouch for the quality of the teaching and courses of the MRes programme. I aspire to do a phd in the US as well and have thought of doing the Mres and then moving out of the program after 2 years if I get into a phd programme. But last time I checked with the department, they told me that since they offer funding to all the students in the MRes cohort they expect the students to stay in the programme till the MRes+ PhD ends. You should check with them again just to be sure. If they let you do it, its probably a good idea. The MRes courses are very rigorous and they let you take maths and stats courses from outside the department. You will get to work on a thesis and thereby get yourself a letter or two. I am not sure about the other two MRes programmes but Warwick and UCL are a really good prep for a phd. The remedy for your low undergrad scores is simply a letter from your masters prof who can write a good letter for you, which states that your undergrad grades are not a true reflection of your potential. Although the MRES idea is good, I have to say this. I know that you have a lot of RA experience already. I have seen so many profiles on this forum and on linkedin and I can say with a lot of certainty that a good pre-doc/RA position at top20 US to top10 EU can do more good than any number of advanced degrees in maths/stats/econ. The letter that a good researcher at a good US/EU uni can write for his/her pre-docs will help negate all your weak points. I would strongly suggest going to the "not at NBER RA positions" site and apply to as many pre-doc positions as you can. Given your experience, you will easily get into a good position. The closer those positions are to your area of interest the better it is for you. Even if they are not, its still good research experience and if you do well, you will still get good letters. Most pre-doc positions also let you take grad courses in econ/maths/stats while paying you decently. So its an overall pro. Your gre scores are fine. topping the class at any good uni is a very good signal. I feel that good letters will help you secure a good admission so you should probably work on that. all the best
  4. Hi, I am an Indian with a masters degree in the UK. This is my advice: Since you said you come from a top 3 uni in India and it has no record of sending sending students to top phds in the US, I am guessing it is not DSE or ISI. It looks like you have done some serious Econ and good enough math, so I think you have a shot at getting into the masters degrees you mentioned above. 1) You should know that MPhil in Economic Research at Cambridge is a pretty good signal to phd adcoms everywhere and I believe that with your background and very good reference letters speaking to your ranking in your cohort, you would be able to get in. However, if you can afford to pay for Oxford's Mphil, it is a better option. A 2 year course would give you more time to settle down and get used to the uk system and at the same time will help you with applying for a phd program at the beginning of the second year without having to wait for a year. The LSE EME course is considered ridiculously hard and would not recommend doing it EVER!! 2) If you do a masters from the above unis, you are guaranteed a place in their phd program if you get a distinction (70%) in their MPhil/MSc courses. However, getting a distinction is not very easy and will need a lot of hard work. I would also not recommend doing a phd at Cambridge because the professors there are considered to be aloof and seated on a high horse for some reason. The ranking for PhD programmes in the UK is LSE>Oxford>UCL>Cambridge=Warwick (generally). 3) It depends on your interests obviously.... If you manage to secure a distinction in one of the above masters degrees, it would make sense to apply only to top 20 unis in the US because you are guaranteed a place in a very good uni in the UK. In my experience, aiming for a US PhD makes a lot more sense because there are simply more unis in the US and more post-phd opportunities. It is hard for a UK phD to compete with US phds in the US job market. And to aim for a US PhD the fool proof way is to get as much maths as possible. especially if you are interested in quantitative macro or metrics. An applied maths degree with some PhD level Econ modules would be a great signal to adcoms but again its hard to get into this line without a formal maths background. Please let me know if you have any other qs. Hope this was helpful!!!
  5. - Firstly, you need to understand is that "quantitative" acc to US phds is serious proof based maths and stats and phd level econ modules. - Second - I have seen people from my university, Warwick MSc in Econ (top5) and not as rigorous as the other 4, who have done well in the Econ MSc and later went on to do an applied maths or pure maths MSc at Warwick after the MSc in economics and have secured places in top 20 US PhD. Moreover, Warwick is changing its course structure and will offer from 2020 September, a harder and more theoretical track for students interested in doing a phd later. This will be on par with other 4 masters in the top 5. My suggestion: Check if anyone from Nottingham's metrics prog have secured good phd admissions. Also see if you can take some math modules from the maths department alongside Econ courses. Courses like real analysis, point-set topology, probability theory, stochastic processes, numerical analysis will help a lot in prepping for a phd coursework and also later in your career. Also check out the MSc at Edinburgh, I have heard that their MSc course is quite rigorous. Link - Prospective MSc. They have also started another course which focusses on providing maths foundation to Econ students so they can compete in phd admissions. Link.- CPD (Mathematical Economics). I am quite sure that getting into a good US phd from a non top 5 school in UK is very hard and you will need to do a lot of extra coursework later on to make up for it. Better to aim at top 5 UK MScs (not LSE EME) and work hard to get a distinction. An usual option would be doing an applied maths degree at LSE which offers a mix of Econ and maths. This will help quite a lot in admissions if you can secure a distinction. If you think you can get into LSE MSc Econ and not EME, try to do that. It is not as rigorous as EME and securing a distinction will get you into the phd. Like ddquant said, securing above 70% in masters progs of LSE, UCL, Cambridge and Oxford will get you into their own phd programmes and possibly into other top 5 UK and top 20-30 US. Incase of Warwick, you will need at least 80% to seem competitive and get very good letters from profs. It is really hard to say what you need to do to ensure admission. Others on this forum who are more knowledgeable and experienced than me will tell you that the admission process is fairly random and can be frustrating. All I can say is always watch out for good admission outcomes of people from your uni or unis similar to yours and see what helped them get the admissions. Scary fact: EME is a very difficult course. So difficult that a dude from my uni who is really smart and capable and topped the entire MSc in econ cohort went onto do another MSc in EME at LSE and could not even secure a distinction. That should tell you something about the EME course.
  6. Type of Undergrad: BComm in Accounting in a good Indian university Undergrad GPA: 75% First Grad : MSc Economics - UK Uni - One of the top Euro master`s program. It is ranked around top 25-30 worldwide according to Tilburg and Repec rankings. Grad GPA: 76% - First Class Second Grad: MSc Applied Math - 2 years course - top 20 world - UK University Grad II GPA - 71% - First Class GRE: 154V/166Q/ AWA 4.5 Math & Stat Courses: Undergrad: Calculus & Real Analysis 1&2 (Both A), Linear Algebra (A), Ordinary Differential Eq. (A), Partial Differential Equations (A), Stochastic Processes (A), Optimization (A), Complex Analysis (A), Stochastic Analysis (A-), Topology (A), Dynamic Stochastic Control (A), Measure Theory (A), Functional Analysis I (A-). Econ Courses: Graduate: Game Theory (A), Advanced Microeconomics (A+), Advanced Macroeconomics (A+), Advanced Econometrics (A+), Economics of Financial Markets ©, Topics in Public Finance (A+), PhD Level Metrics (A). Research Experience: None. LORs : One from head of the econ dept - Knows me very well - strong letter; One from a famous researcher in econometrics from top 15 US - taught me MSc and PhD level metrics - strong letter; Another from my statistics professor - knows me well - strong letter. Interests: Empirical Macroeconomics, Time Series Econometrics. Students from my uni have gone to UCLA, UBC, UofT, Stanford, NYU, Minnesota, Cornell PhDs. What are my chances with Top 20 US? I am worried about the C in economics in financial markets. I feel that was just a prof who is very harsh with evaluation. I was really surprised that it happened. Are my GRE scores ok? Anything I can do to improve my chances?
  7. Thank you so much laborsabre. i think i will take it again.... don't want to take a risk.
  8. Hi, This may seem very counterintuitive but I am very interested in time series analysis and macro-econometrics. However, in my first year of economics degree in took a rather difficult time series module and got a borderline fail grade. After that I have taken much more complex maths(serious analysis, topology), stats (Brownian motion, probability theory, stochastic processes, stochastic stimulation) and metrics (time series included as part of a broad metrics module - following Hayashi, Brockwell & Davis) modules and received straight As. Now, i have a choice to take a time series module again. Do i take it? Instead of this I could take a math module or a stats module. Thanks
  9. Hi there, Profile: International student Undergraduate: Commerce - Not well known outside home country Percentage - 75% - this is a decent score. Cleared a very difficult famous accounting charter exam in India alongside my bachelors- only 11% of test takers clear in the 1st attempt - will this help prove academic ability in any way? Masters - Economics - Top 5 Economics depts UK Percentage - Distinction - Top 5% of the class. Diploma in maths - Distinction - Top 5% of class .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... Courses from MSc in economics and diploma in maths - courses from undergrad not very relevant to economics. Economics topics - Intermediate micro (82), Intermediate Macro (72), Econometrics (65), Money and banking (64), MSc Macro (78), MSc Micro (82), MSc Metrics (78), Game Theory (79), Public Finance (78), Asset pricing (80). The MSc modules are somewhere between intermediate courses and graduates courses in terms of rigorousness. Math topics covered - Partial Differential Equations (75), Real analysis I (74), Real analysis II (72), Complex Analysis (75), Ordinary Differential Equations (78), Stochastic Processes (70), Linear Algebra (80), Optimisation (73). ......................................................................................................................................................................................................... Research Experience - none Potential References - One from the head of the department who taught me undergrad level metrics - he knows me well, did his PhD from top in Australia. Another from math professor where I did my Math diploma - knows me very well and have discussed a lot of stuff with him with regard to mathematical applications in economics. Another from my dissertation supervisor, an associate professor who did his phd from an ok uni in the UK but I managed to really impress him with my MSc dissertation. He gave me very good marks on my dissertation. GRE - Q/V/AWA - 166/154/4.5 Research Interests: Macroeconomics, Time series My goal is to apply to the top 20 Economics PhD programmes. I fee like I should either do a course that strengthens my math profile or my economics profile. Its really hard to get a full time RA opportunity in the UK so i thought i should decide to focus on coursework and grades. i am hoping that my dissertation supervisor's reference would be sufficient proof of research potential. In the same university where i did my MSc in economics there is a course MSc in applied math that students in that past have taken and were placed in top 20 phd in economics in the US. This course allows you to take advanced math courses and phd level economics modules from the econ department. This will also help me build better relations with some of my potential referees and perhaps obtain a stronger reference from one of the profs teaching phd students. As part of a dissertation i will again get to reach out to some profs who are well known and write a dissertation under them. I could choose modules such as: Measure Theory Stochastic Analysis Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis Functional Analysis I Advanced Econometric Theory Introduction to Topology Advanced Real Analysis Another choice I have is to go for the LSE EME course where the coursework is perfect preparation for phd in the US but may not help me get a good reference as it is a short 9 month course without any dissertation element. I am worried if my lack of RA experience is going to count against me. Students from my program (Msc in economics) before me have gotten into Stanford, NYU, UofT, UBC, UCLA, Minnesota. Which course should i choose to maximise my chances of top 20 phd? Is there something else i can do to improve my chances of getting into the top 20 US Econ programmes? Please guide me.... :eager: Thanks a lot in advance.....
  10. Hi, When your major in your undergrad and masters is the same, the uni will definitely weigh your masters grades more. Since your major in your undergrad was in Math, which is definitely harder than economics, it may not count much against you. Try to explain what happened in your undergrad. If your grades were poor in a particular year, then explain what happened. It would be harder to explain if you did poorly throughout your undergrad. Also in your math degree it would help if you did well on modules like real analysis, topology and statistics related modules since these are given importance. If you did badly on pure math modules and did well on the above listed ones, you should be fine. Also try to get a good gre quant score. At least 166. I would encourage you to apply. With good references from econ profs and good gre scores you might have a chance. All the best!
  11. Hi there, Profile: Indian Student Undergraduate: Business - Not well known outside home country Percentage - 75% - Not great but not so bad. Post Graduate Diploma - Economics - Top 5 Economics depts UK Percentage - Distinction Masters - Economics - Top 5 Economics depts UK Percentage - Distinction - Top of the class of 120 - got an award Math and Econ Covered - Linear Algebra, Calculus, Advanced Micro, Advanced Macro, Advanced Econometrics, PhD level metrics and PhD level macro. Masters in Interdisciplinary Mathematics - Same institution Percentage - Distinction (Expecting) - Might be in the top 5 in the class. Math topics covered - Partial Diff Eq(75), Real analysis(74), Complex Analysis(65), Topology(78), Probability theory(72), Stochastic analysis(68), Non Linear Analysis(77), Fourier Analysis(70) Group theory (66). Research Experience - Worked with a Macro professor at the UK uni at which i did my MSc as a summer intern in my area of interest. Can get a good reference from him - he did his PhD at one of the top 5 US unis. Also, worked for different professors for a couple of months here and there for 2 years. References - One from the head of the department who taught me undergrad level metrics - he knows me well, did his PhD from top 3 Australia - also my MSc dissertation advisor. Another from math professor where i did my MSc - knows me very well and have discussed a lot of stuff with him with regard to mathematical applications in economics. GRE - Q/V/AWA - 170/155/4.5 Research Interests: Labour economics, Macroconometrics (Still not sure which one i will pursue) My goal is to apply to the top 25 Economics PhD programmes. I am worried that i don't have an undergraduate degree in Economics and have learned all of my basics through post graduate diplomas. Though i have a masters in Economics i am scared that adcoms might see my undergrad major and reject me. I am not sure if my lack of RA experience is going to count against me. Students from my program (Msc in economics) before me have gotten into Stanford, NYU, UofT, UBC, UCLA. Is there something i can do to improve my chances of getting into the top 25 US Econ programmes. Please guide me.... :eager: Thanks a lot in advance.....
  12. Hi there, Profile: Indian Student Undergraduate: Business - Not well known outside home country Percentage - 75% - Not great but not so bad. Post Graduate Diploma - Economics - Top 5 Economics depts UK Percentage - Distinction Masters - Economics - Top 5 Economics depts UK Percentage - Distinction Math and Econ Covered - Linear Algebra, Calculus, Advanced Micro, Advanced Macro, Advanced Econometrics. Post Graduate Diploma - Mathematics - Kings College London (Pursuing) Percentage - Distinction (Expecting) Math topics covered - Partial Diff Eq, Real analysis, Complex Analysis, Topology, Probability theory, Stochastic analysis, Non Linear Analysis, Fourier Analysis etc Research Experience - Worked with a Macro professor at the UK uni at which i did my MSc as a summer intern in area of interest. Can get a good reference from him - he did his PhD at one of the top 5 US unis GRE - Q/V/AWA - 166/154/4.5 Research Interests: International Macro, Labour economics, Macroconometrics, Monetary (Still not sure which one i will pursue) My goal is to apply to the top 30 Economics PhD programmes. I am worried that i dont have a solid undergraduate foundation in Economics and have learned all of my basics through post graduate diplomas. Though i have a masters in Economics i am scared that adcoms might see my undergrad major and reject me. Also worried about my GRE Quant. I am planning to do an MSc in Mathematics after the Diploma in Maths, however i am ready to work as an RA for a while if necessary. Is there something i can do to improve my chances of getting into the top30 US Econ programmes. Please guide me.... :eager: Thanks a lot in advance.....
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