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Found 4 results

  1. Hi, I am applying for economics and finance phd programs. I have been working with a prestigious professor in finance (Ivy) for the past year. We are close to drafting a working paper (probably expect it in Dec.) in which he and I will be co-authors. I intend to submit the paper as a supplementary document after it is finished. He is quite convinced that the paper is significant and believes it will be on a top general interest economics journal. The problem is the paper concerns timing. Even if it becomes accepted and published in a good journal, it won't be done in time to have a major impact on my admissions. I have concentrated much of my effort for the past year in this research and am wondering if I made the right choice solely focusing on this project. For clarifications, I took the usual math courses and did a masters in statistics. Also he is writing a rec letter for me and sent out his recommendation letter and assessments while I was present. Any feedback or opinion would be appreciated.
  2. :)Hi, Im New to Urch and I would be so greatful to get some criticism on my reaserch paper. Its on a novel called "weep not, child" And the topics i chose to elaborate on were love and family.. can you tell me if i actually tied in the theme of community with the two! ALSO, Is it interesting or boring.. anything i should change.. please help and give feed back. My thesis clear on what im going to talk about in the research paper? Anything is helpful. Thanks Introduction A family entails a cluster of parents and the existence or non-existence of children cohabiting in the same environment. The simple definition also summarizes related people by blood or through marriage. The family institution involves special intimacy and loyalty regarding the involved persons. Love refers to the expression of passionate affection towards other individuals. Love depicts elements of personal attachments and this occurs among closely rated persons that include parents, friends and relatives. The connection between family members originates from the expression of love and attachment. Family members depict love in different ways, which revolve around the immediate concerns. “Weep Not Child” by Ngugi wa Thiongo’s shows a connection between characters through the themes of love and family institutions. The presentation of the narration revolves around an individual through the viewpoint of a protagonist. This displays a heartily connection with the soul in the individuals community. The tale focuses on exploring on different narrations within a single context. The narration avoids a cultural documentation through the presentation of several minor plotting. The settings include major characters like Ngotho, Mwihaki, Njoroge and Mr. Howland. Ngugi displays the family connection of affectionate elements through Njoroge’s father. This is further illustrated through the romance between Njoroge and Mwihaki. The varying standpoints illustrate deep attachments in the objectives to deliver a mindset community, meaning they act upon their emotions. This paper will attempt to explore the dominating elements connecting the characters through family pillars and romance. This exploration forms the discussion on individual character with reference to the presented community setup. Ngugi’s intentions reveal the urge to define the characters society (Ngũgĩ, 211). Ngugi’s “Weep Not Child” involves a numerous of primary and secondary characters. The author allocates specific roles to different characters within the story. The characters include Nyokabi who is a second to a patriarch in the story. Nyokabi displays rare qualities of dedication for her children. Her role also depicts the love in building the family’s peaceful coexistence. Njoroge plays the role of a family visionary in Ngotho’s household. Njoroge is main protagonist in the story; he displays the family attachment through the objective to gain education and improve his family’s condition. Kamau (Njoroge’s half brother) is challenged by the family difference. He is training as a carpenter in the village settings and limited to an opportunity to join school. This shows a family institution scenario with rules and regulations. The characters description changes when his brother joins Mau Mau. This awards him responsibilities to support the family back in the village. This is a typical family setting where a man provides for the family (Ngũgĩ, 171). Jacobo is a wealthy individual and a father to Mwihaki in the story. Mr. Howlands is a source of misunderstanding and British citizen. The man is a source of conflict and the remedy to the Mau Mau rebellion. John is Jocobos son who quests to study in England. This character depicts the affection between a father and a son. Ngotho is a veteran that served the First World War in the novel. The characters family includes Njeri and four children. The children include Boro, Kamau and Kori. Kamau and Njoroge constitute the family and a fifth deceased son called Mwangi. Boro avenges his brother’s death by heading the guerilla group. Mwihaki dominates in the stories elementary shift of focus. She is a daughter to Jacobo and a lover to Njoroge. Lucia is also Jacobo’s daughter and teaches at an elementary school. Juliana also constitutes Jacobos family as a wife and mother. The family ordinance in the story recognizes the male counterpart. Ngotho depicts this element as the family in Muhua village. He directs both wives on family decisions and proposals on community activities. The family consists of two wives with a conflict of interest due to the categorical separation. Njeri obtains entire privileges in the family as an elder woman. The children acknowledge her and call her with absolute respect. The close attraction depicts a string family bond between Njeri and her children. This accounts for the misunderstanding between the two women in the family (Ngũgĩ, 1:)90). Nyokabi is a hardworking woman living in Mahua village in Kenya. Living in poverty, Nyokabi gives the son a chance to go school. The family of Nyokabi is not able to provide education privileges to Nyokabi’ siblings but Nyokabi shows love to the family by offering the son, Njoroge a chance to be educated. Njoroge is very happy even though the mother is not able to afford lunch in school. Njoroge runs to tell Kamau the good news. Although Kamau is a half brother to Njoroge, Njoroge shows love by running to tell Kamau the good news. Kamau never got a chance to be educated but Kamau is very happy for Njoroge. Kamau works as an apprentice carpenter in the village. Both boys hope the trainings they are undergoing will make them as rich as two of the most successful people in the village, Jacobo and Howlands. Jacobo is an educated villager and Howlands is an English man that lived with the community for quite a period (Veneziano, 391). Both Howland and Jacobo a admired by the village because of the wealth both of them have. Even though Howland and Jacobo are role models of the village, both of them a subjected to local argument (Ngũgĩ, 219). The narrator of the book talks of the landscape and the local community. The narrator also describes a paved road that passes through Mahua. The Italian prisoners that were captured during the world war two built the paved road. The road also offers a simple path that the natives took while crossing the forest. The narrator also shows how the people of mahua show love for the village they live in by walking around the village and admiring the view. The people also live and interact as a family. The men meet at a local barber’s shop where the barber entertains them with stories. The most admired story is how the barber slept with white sex workers in Jerusalem. Ngotho is the husband of Nyokabi. Ngotho expresses the love for family by leaving the friends in the barber and going home to spend time with the family. Nyokabi is the second wife. Although the common jealousy, Ngotho’s family live in peace and harmony (Ngũgĩ, 161). The wives and all the children have a mutual understanding. This shows how love for the whole family has overcome jealousy. As Ngotho walks slowly home, Ngotho recalls how it was in world war one. The sons of Ngotho, Boro and Mwangi, joined the world war two. The sons admired the father’s courage that motivated them to join the bloody war. This shows sons’ love to father and this proves how the sons are as brave as their father is. As Ngotho arrives home and gets the good news that Njoroge is going to school. Ngotho is very happy for the son and feels proud knowing Njoroge will be as educated as Jacobo’s daughter. Even though it is the duty of a man to take the son to school, Nyokabi shows care and responsibility for the well-being of the family. The whole family is grateful one of them is going to be educated not caring who it is. This proves that the family a united and connected with love. Any success falling to the family no matter whom it is, to all of them its joy (Ngũgĩ, 106). Love is a wide theme addressed in Ngugi’s “Weep Not Child”. Njoroge illustrates affection to his family members. The narration talks of him helping other family members without discrimination. This explains the existing bond between Njoroge and kamau. The unique attachment translates to a good relationship in the family. Njoroge extends the family bond to Mwihaki with a different attitude (Marilyn 56). He shows intimate love for Mwihaki with a consideration of a possible sister-brother relationship. The family members in the story show unity through the belief on pursuing education. Education translates improves the family life for a better standard. Kamau illustrates this fact through providing education with the income earned. The family mother bond exists between Njoroge and his mother. This shows a parent verses children relationship that also shows a family unity. Ngugi perceives a unique family setting concerning uniting families. A community influences the family aspects among individuals. An outward effect from a society influences the living conditions in a family setup. Ngugi depicts the scenario existing among family members concerning relationships in the context. The Mau Mau movement affects the relationship between family members. Boro engages in a misunderstanding with his son due to a political uprising. The circumstances affect the family setting about the father-son relationship. The in the end translates to another family conflict between a mother and a father. Family institutions depict unique structures concerning relationship bonds (Ngũgĩ, 214). Conclusion The connection between family members originates from the expression of love and attachment. Family members depict love in different ways that revolve around the immediate concerns. “Weep Not Child” by Ngugi wa Thiongo’s shows a connection between characters through the themes of love and family institutions. The novel demonstrates the position of the family dimensions in a person's life (Fulton, 112). The presentation of the narration revolves around an individual through the viewpoint of a protagonist. This displays a heartily connection with the soul in the individuals community. The tale focuses on exploring on different narrations within a single context. The narration avoids a cultural documentation through the presentation of several minor plotting. Love is a wide theme addressed in Ngugis “Weep Not Child”. Njoroge illustrates affection to his family members. The narration talks of him helping other family members without discrimination. This explains the existing bond between Njoroge and kamau. The unique attachment translates to a good relationship in the family. Njoroge extends the family bond to Mwihaki with a different attitude. He shows intimate love for Mwihaki with a consideration of a possible sister-brother relationship. Work Cited Ngũgĩ, wa T. Weep Not, Child. London: Penguin Classics, 2010. Print. McCann, Jeanne. Family Love. iUniverse, 2002. Print. Montgomery, Marilyn J. & Sorell, Gwendolyn T. “Differences in love attitudes across family life stages,” Family Relations: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Family Studies, 46.1 (1997): 55-61. Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, Weep Not, Child. Heinemann, 1987. Print. Rohner, Ronald P, and Robert A. Veneziano. "The Importance of Father Love: History and Contemporary Evidence." Review of General Psychology. 5.4 (2001): 382-405. Print. Sheen, Fulton J. Children and Parents. New York: eBooks, 2014. Print.
  3. I have to write a research paper for my online composition class on Monday and I haven’t started yet. :blue:The topic is “Compare and contrast two stages of a person's life.” Help me, please!!
  4. I had to do a research paper on childbirth in Puritan New England, and how it is relevant to The Handmaid's Tale. I would love any feedback, suggestions, grammar/spelling corrections, etc. Thanks in Advance! Childbirth is primeval. It has been going on since the beginning of mammals, but birth is entirely different now then it use to be. "In the healthiest seventeenth century communities, one infant in ten died before the age of five. In less healthy environments, three children in ten died before their fifth birthday." ("Childbirth in Early America," 2011, para. 6). However, it was not the actual birth that killed women and children, but complications they did not know how to fix. Such as: dehydration, hemorrhage, and infection, just to name a few. Although it still does happen, infant fatality is much less common today. In general, most of a colonial woman's life was focused on children and childbirth. "On average, women had about nine children, and about 90-95% of women bore children. Their children were typically born about 2 ½ years apart..." (Brewer, para. 1). In a typical colonial birth, a midwife attended instead of a physician. Men were not allowed to attend a birth, unless there were medical complications. A woman was also never alone during childbirth, "In colonial America, the typical woman gave birth to her children at home, while female kin and neighbors clustered at her bedside to offer support and encouragement." ("Childbirth in Early America." 2011, para. 8). Unlike today, there were no painkillers to aid in childbirth, aside from alcohol. Women were told that pain was "God's punishment for Eve's sin of eating the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden". ("Childbirth in Early America." 2011, para. 10). What ever occurred after birth depended on the wealth of the woman. Wealthy women were expected to spend weeks in bed regaining their strength, whilst poorer women usually had to begin working after a couple of days. Nowadays, we are aware of the proper precautions we must take for a safe infant delivery. This was not the case in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Infection was a very dangerous possibility due to lack of hygiene. Many diseases and epidemics spread just because hand washing was not as common. "In fact, it was common during those times for doctors to attend autopsies of recently deceased people who had died from very contagious diseases and then to attend a birth without washing their hands!" (Martell, 2008, para. 27). If something like this happened today, the offending physician would be fired and/or sued! Another likely cause of fatality was improper positioning of the baby, or obstruction. "Obstructed labor was perhaps the number one cause of death to birthing mothers, previous to the 1600's. With the invention of forceps, came a great increase in the survival rate of mothers and babies during childbirth. Previous to this time, death during childbirth was "an expected" tragedy." (Martell, 2008, para. 18). Forceps are still used today for women who need assistance with birth. It is highly unlikely for a mother or child nowadays to die due to a breach infant. The actual act of birth has remained unchanged, we can't change that, but the way we deliver babies has changed drastically. The majority of women in the United States no longer have children in their homes with a midwife, although it is still common in some parts of the world. The most common type of birth in America is with a physician in a hospital. Unlike the seventeenth century, we also have multiple forms of pain control, the most popular being an epidural. "In some hospitals, over 80 to 90 percent of women who give birth use an epidural for pain control, and nationally, around 70 percent of women have an epidural during birth." ("The Epidural," 2006, para. 1). The risk of infant fatality has also decreased immensely. Our knowledge of infection control, cesarean sections, and the use of forceps and vacuums, allow the infant death rate to be very low. Even though the novel The Handmaid's Tale is set in the future, the births resemble upper-class Puritan births. Fertility is very rare amongst the women of Gilead, so birth is a ceremony for all of the handmaids. A doctor, the wife of the commander, and all of the handmaids, surrounded the mother. While the mother was in labor, the handmaids were told to chant together to help her birth the child. Even though the handmaids would give birth to the child, they acted more as wet-nurses than mothers. They could keep the baby for a couple of months to nurse it, but then the wife would take care of it. By the time this novel was written, there were already medications available to help with the pain of childbirth. However, the women of Gilead were allowed no drugs, as it might interfere with the health of the child and birth was already rare enough. The actual birth ceremony is only mentioned once in the novel, but childbirth is the heart of The Handmaid's Tale. The lack of fertility is the reason why Gilead and its extreme rules were created.
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