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How to get a high GRE quant score - For average math or non-math test takers


zorrillo
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Zorillo wrote:

 

'For example, what is the probability that a number amongst the first 1000 positive integers is divisible by 8? Don’t start counting the multiples of 8! The figure of 1000 is a red herring. Use a little common sense. The numbers will be 8,16,24,32…So, 1 in every 8 numbers is a multiple of 8, even if you consider the first million integers. So Probability is 1/8 (Question from Power-Prep.)'

 

Hi Zorrillo, I hate to nit-pick, but that approach only works because 1000 is divisible by 8.If the number mentioned was 999 or 1001, the probability would NOT have been 1/8.In my experience, its always better to do probability problems ab initio.

Great post otherwise.Do keep up the good work.

 

Cheers

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Well, I used free material on:

and I did many practice exams on: GraduateTestPrep.com // Online GRE Preparation

also, I used kaplan GRE General Study Book

 

These really helped me. GraduateTestPrep.com // Online GRE Preparation featured new upto date GRE questions in an online computer adaptive test format. By doing their tests, I felt more confident and I am very happy with my final scores!

 

Good luck everybody,

 

Lara

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Zorillo wrote:

 

'For example, what is the probability that a number amongst the first 1000 positive integers is divisible by 8? Don’t start counting the multiples of 8! The figure of 1000 is a red herring. Use a little common sense. The numbers will be 8,16,24,32…So, 1 in every 8 numbers is a multiple of 8, even if you consider the first million integers. So Probability is 1/8 (Question from Power-Prep.)'

 

Hi Zorrillo, I hate to nit-pick, but that approach only works because 1000 is divisible by 8.If the number mentioned was 999 or 1001, the probability would NOT have been 1/8.In my experience, its always better to do probability problems ab initio.

Great post otherwise.Do keep up the good work.

 

Cheers

 

 

How would you go about in solving the probability problem if the number is 999 or 1001? Thanks.

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How would you go about in solving the probability problem if the number is 999 or 1001? Thanks.

 

if you divide thousand by 8,youll realise that there are 125 multiples of 8 from one to thousand inclusive.hence prob of getting a multiple of 8 125/1000=1/8.if the number is 1001,then prob of getting multiple of 8 is 125/1001(slightly lesser since you have one more number that cant be divisible by 8).similarly if the number is 999,the prob is 124/999.(now there are only 124 multiples).

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Rule of 3:

 

A car travels 50 km in 30 mins. How many kms does it travel in 15 mins?

 

30 mins == 50 kms

15 mins == ?

 

 

Rule of 5:

 

3 machines print 25 pages in 40 secs. How many pages do 5 machines of the same type print in 20 secs?

 

3 machines == 40 sec == 25 pages

5 machines == 20 sec == ?

 

Easy. They are called so because of the number of terms involved; 3 and 5 resp.

3 machines x 40 seconds = 120 machine-seconds make 25 pages

 

120 machine-seconds / 5 machines = 24 seconds for 5 machines do 25 pgs

 

Ratio: 24 secs/ 25 pgs = 20 secs/ x pgs

 

25(20) = 24x

x = 20.83 ?

 

5 machines in 20 seconds make 20.83 pages? Is this correct? Please advise.

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OK, quick question here: Are the quantitative practice sets in the PowerPrep software adaptive? I ask this because I've been studying Barron's math review for a long time and also took 2 (paper-based) model tests. I only did the first quantitative comparison practice set in PowerPrep, but it was very easy compared to the stuff in Barron's. However, I did stupidly miss the very first question in that first quantitative comparison set of practice questions because I misread a number. I wonder if this is why it was so easy. So are the practice sets adaptive or fixed; if they are fixed, then why am I wasting time studying all this difficult stuff in Barron's when the PowerPrep software seems so easy?
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