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Can someone kindly evaluate my GRE Issue Essay?


Rose Mary
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Universities should require every student to take a variety of courses outside the student's field of study.

Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the claim. In developing and supporting your position, be sure to address the most compelling reasons and/or examples that could be used to challenge your position.

The above statement throws light on the issue of incorporating a multi-disciplinary approach in education by making it mandatory for students to take up courses in areas other than their current specialization. Clarity in this regard is absolutely essential and has stoked the interests of public policy experts, educationalists and academic institutions for a long time. It is extremely important to have a thorough understanding of the immediate as well as long-term repercussions of enforcing such mandates on young and inquisitive minds .

While it is extremely important to encourage students to explore fields of study apart from the subject they have chosen, it should not be made mandatory. One can nudge the student to enforce a desired behavior. Care must be taken not to compel the student or steer them away from their true interests. In this manner, one can provide adequate freedom of choice to the student. The goal should be to be in the sweet spot between guidance and freedom, rather than a compulsion. 

One cannot help but remember the age old adage, " Jack of all trades, master of none", which rings true in the light of this argument. To learn a new subject as an elective or a subject just for one or two semesters might not provide students the skills required for dexterous application  and to rise to the challenges of the modern world. In this sense, the compulsion to take up the course will prove to be utterly futile and a complete waste of a student's precious time.

Furthermore, it should be noted that when students are asked to explore the nooks and corners of the subject they are  interested in, it can be expected that they identify the complimentary fields of studies on their own. When they have discovered their interests by themselves, it is bound to generate a more genuine and long-lasting energy and drive that will be nurtured towards mastering the other subject. For example, a student who majors in economics is bound to lean towards undertaking courses in mathematics, statistics and data analysis, since an understanding of these subjects can enable him/her to have a more comprehensive understanding of their prime subject. Doing certified courses in these subjects will work in the best interests of the students as it can help them further their academic pursuits as well as make it easier to present credible accreditations while applying for jobs.

One can argue that not all students can be expected to know what lies on the other side of the spectrum while selecting courses that are restricted to the subject they are primarily interested in. In addition, a multi-disciplinary approach to studies provides the student a peak into different vast worlds of organized knowledge and insights. However, this optimism is misplaced as at he end of the day, it is the student who should be given the freedom to choose and any form of paternalism in this regard must be eliminated. An individual can be expected to choose courses that are best suited to his/her circumstances and ambition.

In  a nutshell, a compelling case can be created to counter the statement presented above. A good education system is very essential to the development of creating academicians, professionals and workers who will power economies and inventions. Therefore it is extremely important to carefully weigh the pros and con before implementing stringent mandates and compulsions on  young students as it can be an obstacle to creativity and specialization.

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This is great, intelligent, educated English. Loved reading it!

For the GRE writing, I would make the following suggestions:

First, at least for me, the big question is whether college students should specialize in one area of study or be introduced to subjects they may not otherwise learn about. Both approaches have great benefits.

On the one hand, a future software engineer may not really need to learn Art History. But who knows whether that particular body of knowledge will make her more creative in problem-solving?

On the other hand, college graduates today may end up changing careers several times in their lives; maybe a more well-rounded education best suits the needs of this group.

Also, you can't really talk about this matter without addressing the costs, in terms of both money and time, of one approach over the other. In the US, an education can put graduating students in debt that will take years to pay off. ($200,000 is not unheard of for doctors, for example.)

And perhaps society would be better off graduating more skilled professionals more quickly and economically for a particular task than adding a year or two to their education; if we have a shortage of, say, psychologists right now, maybe have a psychology-only track to get those students out and practicing.

It's a complex issue! Especially in the US.

Some minor points that I noticed as I was reading:

> The above statement throws light

Technically, the statement is really only a statement; it doesn't provide more information on the issue, right?

> Clarity in this regard is absolutely essential and has stoked the interests of public policy experts, educationalists and academic institutions for a long time.

I'm being picky, but this is a bit of a throw-away sentence, as it doesn't add to your argument and feels boilerplate. I prefer the sentence that follows it.

> the skills required for dexterous application

I think of dexterity as involving skill with the hands, as a magician might want to achieve.

> identify the complimentary fields of studies

Use the other complementary. Just think of the related word complete to remember this one.

>  it is the student who should be given the freedom to choose and any form of paternalism in this regard must be eliminated

This is a great point. However, you may want to address its counterargument--that young students have less understanding of the type of education that will benefit them (and society) in the long term.

On 10/31/2021 at 4:06 AM, Rose Mary said:

In  a nutshell, a compelling case can be created to counter the statement presented above. A good education system is very essential to the development of creating academicians, professionals and workers who will power economies and inventions. Therefore it is extremely important to carefully weigh the pros and con before implementing stringent mandates and compulsions on  young students as it can be an obstacle to creativity and specialization.

It's vital to have a clear stance and not just say that it's important to evaluate the options carefully.

The original essay for preservation:

On 10/31/2021 at 4:06 AM, Rose Mary said:

Universities should require every student to take a variety of courses outside the student's field of study.

Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the claim. In developing and supporting your position, be sure to address the most compelling reasons and/or examples that could be used to challenge your position.

The above statement throws light on the issue of incorporating a multi-disciplinary approach in education by making it mandatory for students to take up courses in areas other than their current specialization. Clarity in this regard is absolutely essential and has stoked the interests of public policy experts, educationalists and academic institutions for a long time. It is extremely important to have a thorough understanding of the immediate as well as long-term repercussions of enforcing such mandates on young and inquisitive minds .

While it is extremely important to encourage students to explore fields of study apart from the subject they have chosen, it should not be made mandatory. One can nudge the student to enforce a desired behavior. Care must be taken not to compel the student or steer them away from their true interests. In this manner, one can provide adequate freedom of choice to the student. The goal should be to be in the sweet spot between guidance and freedom, rather than a compulsion. 

One cannot help but remember the age old adage, " Jack of all trades, master of none", which rings true in the light of this argument. To learn a new subject as an elective or a subject just for one or two semesters might not provide students the skills required for dexterous application  and to rise to the challenges of the modern world. In this sense, the compulsion to take up the course will prove to be utterly futile and a complete waste of a student's precious time.

Furthermore, it should be noted that when students are asked to explore the nooks and corners of the subject they are  interested in, it can be expected that they identify the complimentary fields of studies on their own. When they have discovered their interests by themselves, it is bound to generate a more genuine and long-lasting energy and drive that will be nurtured towards mastering the other subject. For example, a student who majors in economics is bound to lean towards undertaking courses in mathematics, statistics and data analysis, since an understanding of these subjects can enable him/her to have a more comprehensive understanding of their prime subject. Doing certified courses in these subjects will work in the best interests of the students as it can help them further their academic pursuits as well as make it easier to present credible accreditations while applying for jobs.

One can argue that not all students can be expected to know what lies on the other side of the spectrum while selecting courses that are restricted to the subject they are primarily interested in. In addition, a multi-disciplinary approach to studies provides the student a peak into different vast worlds of organized knowledge and insights. However, this optimism is misplaced as at he end of the day, it is the student who should be given the freedom to choose and any form of paternalism in this regard must be eliminated. An individual can be expected to choose courses that are best suited to his/her circumstances and ambition.

In  a nutshell, a compelling case can be created to counter the statement presented above. A good education system is very essential to the development of creating academicians, professionals and workers who will power economies and inventions. Therefore it is extremely important to carefully weigh the pros and con before implementing stringent mandates and compulsions on  young students as it can be an obstacle to creativity and specialization.

 

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