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Thread: Management Applicant Profiles

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    Management Applicant Profiles

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    This thread is designed as a consolidation of successful PhD applicants in the management concentration. The moderators have closed this thread to limit the unrelated discussion. As future applicants share their profiles, they will be added to this thread. Please respect their privacy and be thankful that successful applicants are willing to share their profiles with the community.

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    Admission Year: 2014
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GMAT
    Test Scores:
    750 (98%) 48Q (78%) 44V (98%) 6.0W
    Undergrad GPA:
    2.6
    Graduate GPA
    :4.0
    Industry Experience:
    15 years--5 as an entrepreneur, 10 in a mid-sized manufacturing company (most recently in senior management/executive level roles).
    Research Experience: Three papers in progress. I'm first-author on one. One will be submitted to an A journal within the next 2-3 months. Seven conference presentations (including two PDWs, one of which I was a co-organizer).

    Range of Schools Applied:
    3 top 10, 6 top 30
    Total Schools Applied To:
    9Total Offers Given: 6 interviews (2 top 10, 4 top 30); 4 offers (1 top 10, 3 top 30); 2 rejects (1 top 10, 1 top 30); 3 withdrawn (1 top 10, 2 top 30)

    Final Remarks:
    Not sure what I would have done differently--I'm pretty happy with the outcome. I think the fact that I had well-developed research ideas, and have taken the initiative to get involved in research on my own over the past few years carried a lot of weight with adcoms.
    Last edited by tm_associate; 02-27-2014 at 01:24 AM.

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    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful. Good post? Yes | No
    Discipline/Concentration: Management
    Admission Year:
    Fall 2012
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GRE
    Test Scores:
    Q 86%, V 98%
    Undergrad GPA:
    3.2
    Graduate GPA:
    3.9
    Industry Experience:
    5 years in a not-for-profit organization
    Research Experience:
    6 years "on the side": 3 years undergrad, 3 years postgrad


    Range of Schools Applied:
    UTD Top 40
    Total Schools Applied To:
    6
    Total Offers Given:
    2



    Final Remarks:

    Compared to a lot of people, I waited a long time to apply. I learned a lot about research and what it's like to have a career in academia. I only applied to programs I would attend without hesitation, and I was willing to apply more than one year if necessary in order to attend a competitive program. Because I applied to such a small number of schools I was able to spend a lot of time on each application, rewriting nearly all of my SOP each time. In each SOP I named at least one professor whose work interested me and usually commented on ideas I had from one or two of their recent papers. That being said, I still felt insecure during my application process and never could have predicted the outcome.

    Having a paid RA position for a few years is a huge asset and I would recommend staying at least two years. This used to seem like an unreasonable commitment to me but now I understand: research is a slow-moving field compared to other industries; you can't code data for three months and get a stellar letter of recommendation. My letter writers were professors in my field who wrote very kind things in part because they knew me really well after working together for several years.

    I always had a Plan B (alternative career path) so I wouldn't be too crushed if I wasn't admitted. Throughout the process and the PhD, I keep in touch with a lot of non-academic friends who wouldn't judge me (or notice) if I didn't get accepted or failed out later on. It is a nice sanity check.

    If you're aiming for Management/OB, do not stress too much about the grades or the test scores. These departments look for students with the most creative, promising ideas, sometimes with research experience and sometimes straight from industry. The best strategy is to demonstrate (1) that you understand what research is and (2) that your interests match with those of faculty so they see you as a good "fit".
    Last edited by tm_associate; 02-26-2014 at 11:59 PM.

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    Discipline/Concentration: Organizational Behavior
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GMAT
    Test Scores:
    720(93%), 49Q(83%), 40V(90%), 5.5 AWA
    Undergrad GPA:
    3.90 (business)
    Graduate GPA:
    3.96 (heavy quant field)
    Industry Experience:
    business owner (3 years), 5 years additional full-time work experience
    Research Experience:
    conference paper presented at regional conference

    Range of Schools Applied:
    Texas A&M T40 only
    Total Schools Applied To: 14
    Total Offers Given: 3 rejections, 2 interviews, 5 offers, 4 withdraws before heard back from

    Final Remarks:

    Ugrad from teaching school, no doctoral program. MA from same school. Thought this would be a huge disadvantage, which it might have been at some institutions, but for the most part I didn't feel it played too large of a factor. Heavy stats/quant work was probably a good supportive indicator I could handle the rigors of doctoral training.

    1) do your research of schools before hand, i.e. are there enough faculty that can help motivate your possible interests, is the department culture the type you would look for. is their placement reasonable for your goals.

    2) Scores help get you pass the minimum bar... beyond that, research fit with department/faculty, understanding of what your getting yourself into, and intangible traits that should be highlight in your LOR and personal statement help communicate why you would the best fitted applicant for a particular school. Their are no black/white standards, so the more things that you can strengthen in your overall package, the better.

    3) Spend a good deal of time writing, rewriting, editing, rewriting, and editing your personal statement. get feedback from your LOR writers, and others that can help you put your best foot forward.

    4) Prepare yourself for a grueling first year. You will be running around like mad to balance everything. Have a good support network ready.
    Last edited by tm_associate; 01-11-2015 at 09:30 PM.

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    Discipline: Management (Strategy & International Business focus)
    Admission Year:
    2014
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GRE
    Test Scores:
    165 Q (91%), 165 V (95%), AWA 5.5 (97%)
    Undergrad GPA:
    3.87(Major: Business Administration, from a no-name teaching university)
    Graduate GPA:
    3.97(Major: International Affairs, from a slightly better but still little known university)
    LORs:
    three strong letters from 1 Chancellor’s professor and 2 Assistant professors (but only one is research active)
    Industry Experience:
    1 year consumer products industry, 5 years in public policy, 5 years in public statistical agency
    Research Experience (academic only):
    graduate research essay (won an award and was presented at a conference); began data collection project with a professor during the application season but did not mention it in my SOP so I don’t think it did anything anyways

    Range of Schools Applied:
    11 in total, of which 2 were top 5, 3 were top 20, 5 were top 40 and 1 was top 100; rankings based on 2009-2013 Texas A&M management rankings with AMR, AMJ, ASQ, OS and SMJ as selected journals (I eliminated the psych/OB focused journals to remove bias from programs that are strong in OB rather than strategy); I would have liked to adjust for faculty size but didn’t.
    Interview requests:
    9 (2 top 5, 2 top 20, 4 top 40, 1 top 100); I started withdrawing applications from some programs early on so I ended up just doing 5 interviews (2 top 5, 1 top 20, 2 top 40)
    Offers:
    4 (2 top 5, 1 top 20, 1 top 40)

    Final Remarks:
    I am absolutely thrilled with my results. I spent a lot of time and effort in preparing and my advice for future applicants would be to spend your time on things you can control or exert influence over: LORs, standardized test, research interests, SOP. I am very happy I devoted a good amount of time to study for the GRE – I didn’t want my top choices to have any excuse to not admit me so I made sure I was at, or above, their historical averages for admitted students. Secondly, as someone who had been out of school and contact with professors for more than 10 years, I took my time in rebuilding those relationships. Finally I read, read, and read some more, which served three very important purposes: 1) identifying what research area I was truly passionate about - which will pay dividends later on I think; 2) identify who publishes on those topics, and of those people, who appealed to me because of their theoretical approach, methods or whatever – this helped me select my schools based on research interest alignment and not just apply to top 10 without a good reason; and, 3) helped me write an SOP that included research questions that drew on current debates in the literature (and if you’re older like me, it will help adcoms see that your experience will be valuable in informing your research).

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    Discipline:Management
    Admission Year:
    Fall 2014
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GRE
    Test Scores:
    Quant 161 (81%) Verbal 166. (96%)
    Undergrad GPA:
    4.49/5.00 ( Top 1percent)
    Graduate GPA:
    4.79/5.00 ( Top 1 percent)
    LORs:
    1 from graduate school professor, 1 from former employer, 1 from current client!
    Industry Experience:
    7 years
    Research Experience:
    Random qualitative stuff in architecture.
    Teaching Experience:
    TA for undergraduate in architecture
    Range of Schools Applied:
    3 in T10, 3 in in top 50
    Total Schools Applied To:
    6
    Total Offers Given:
    Interviewed by 1, Accepted by 1. Yet to hear from two, rejected by two.

    Final Remarks:
    I wish I had had a better idea of how competitive this process was before starting! Ii did not know about urch until after application deadlines and kinda did this shooting in the dark. I was also running a business and taking care of a two and four year old - yes, i am a mom! I would have done the GRE again to have a better shot at Top 5 schools, I also would have reached out to professors earlier. The school I was accepted in was my second choice and seems like an excellent fit, but I really wanted my first choice!

    Goodluck future PhD applicants

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    Discipline/Concentration: Management OB
    Admission Year: Fall 2014
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GMAT
    Test Scores:
    V 44 (98%) Q 45 (66%) T 720 (94%) AWA 6 (91%) IR 7 (82%)
    Undergrad GPA:
    3.84
    Graduate GPA:
    3.92
    Industry Experience:
    3 years teaching high school, 7 years as small business owner
    Research Experience:
    Graduate research assistant during masters program

    Range of Schools Applied:
    Texas A&M Management productivity T5 to T75
    Total Schools Applied To:
    7
    Total Offers Given:
    3 Interviews, 1 Offer (I'm withdrawing the my applications with the two other schools that I have interviewed with, and accepting the offer that I was given)

    Final Remarks:
    I believe that the aberration in my quantitative GMAT score caused some of the more choosy programs to pass on me. One professor told me this directly. If I had to do it over again, I would practice the GMAT math more, specifically focusing on time since I ran out of time on the quantitative section. It is silly to me that so much of the admission decision is based on this test, but it is a large factor at many schools. The one offer that I received was largely due to research fit, so maybe that school was not so concerned with test scores as long as I met the minimum cutoff. I would also apply more widely than I did. It is expensive to apply widely, but after experiencing the anxiety of the waiting/sweating season, that extra money may have been well-spent.

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    Good post? Yes | No
    Discipline: OB
    Admission Year:
    Fall 2014
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GRE
    Test Scores:
    GRE (97%V 88%Q)
    Undergrad GPA:
    2:1 British system
    Graduate GPA:
    NIL
    LORs:
    2 great letters, 1 was alright
    Industry Experience:
    Some internships
    Research Experience:
    At time of application, 1 year RA, lead author on some independent projects.
    Teaching Experience:
    TA 1 semester MBA
    Range of Schools Applied:
    UTD T30
    Total Schools Applied To:
    17
    Total Offers Given:
    1 Top 15

    Final Remarks:
    Im incredibly humbled by my application experience. It was a mix of emotions-- was encouraged by the fact that there's a huge community of people who are interested in the same things as I am interested in and also at times intimidated by their fantastic backgrounds. Everyone seemed so qualified, and honestly what set me apart was my fit with this particular school that I will be attending this fall. After extensive research about the different schools, I knew that this was the one for me, and I accepted immediately. Will withdraw from everywhere else!

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    Discipline: Management
    Admission Year:
    2014
    Test Used for Admittance:
    GRE
    Test Scores:
    V:163, Q:160 TOEFL: 119,
    Undergrad GPA:
    2.75 (BS in Pharmaceutical Science form a pubic university)
    Graduate GPA:
    3.45 (MBA in HRM and marketing from an AACSB-accredited business school)
    Graduate GPA:
    Still finishing this one (Research Master in business research from a top-5 European university)
    Industry Experience:
    3 years in Human Resources at multinational companies in different industries
    Research Experience:
    1.5 years
    Teaching Experience:
    6 months
    Letters:
    4 LORs, all relatively strong. 2 from big names in the field, one from the dean of my first business school and the last one from the associate dean.

    Range/Number of Schools Applied:
    3 schools, all T-50.
    Offers Given:
    1 offer (my top choice, working with two of my heroes in the field)

    Final Remarks:
    This is my second year applying to PhD positions. The first time I applied to 15 schools but didn't work out. I enrolled in a 2-year research master program to improve my profile and gain some research experience. As you can see, I'm not a typical A-student which goes to show that having stellar grades is just one part of the process. I spent two years working hard to remedy what I believed were my real deficiencies as a researcher: statistics, research methodology and research experience. I was lucky enough to have my application screened by insightful academicians who can see beyond the mere numbers on a transcript and glean my potential as a PhD student from the different elements of my application: my commitment, LORs and work experience. If I could offer some advice from my humble and humbling experience, I would say:
    - Don't just jump into it! Take a long deep look at your profile and identify what your weaknesses are, then do what you can to fix these. It signals to adcoms many things: self-awareness, tenacity, resilience and most of all, commitment.
    - Know your field, your school and who you want to work with.
    - It's a stressful and demanding process so develop a support system. The amazing people on this forum should definitely be part of it!
    - There's always next year so don't doubt yourself if you don't make it the first time. if it's what you really want, then regroup, strategize and take another swing at it.
    - a research master in Europe is a great way to improve your profile. (contact me if you need more information about that)

    Good luck everybody!

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    Re: Management Applicant Profiles

    Acceptance Year: 2015
    Test Used for Admittance: GMAT
    Test Scores: 710 Total (92 percentile) - 41 Verbal (94 percentile), 47 Quantitative (68 percentile), 6 Analytical Writing (92 percentile), 8 Integrated Reasoning (92 percentile)
    Undergrad GPA: 3.54
    Graduate GPA: 3.67
    Industry Experience: 8 years, retail management
    Research Experience: None


    Concentration Applied To: Management (OB)
    Range of Schools Applied To: 13 total (6 within Top 50, additional 5 within Top 10) (Texas A&M Management Department Rankings). Accepted offer from a Top 10 school with great research fit
    Final Results: 4 interviews (including 3 campus visits), 2 offers, 1 withdrawn prior to decision, 1 waitlisted (was the only one on the list. Ultimately rejected), 9 rejections


    Final Remarks: I have never learned so much in such a short period of time. In the 1.5 months between my first phone interview and making my final decision, I learned a great deal about academia and Phd programs. So while I highly recommend doing your homework prior to applying, accept the fact that you will not know everything (nor are you expected to know everything). You are being judged as an applicant on your promise and attitude, not on your knowledge of jargon and how many articles you can mention in your interviews. Now, maybe that is just true for my concentration, but it is the impression I got in general.


    Also, be prepared for rejection, and be able to take it constructively. The acceptance rate for these programs is very low, averaging around 5%. So even if you might be the best applicant at a particular school, odds are that there is a stronger applicant for other schools. Do not take rejection personally. In fact, I would say that your ability to take constructive criticism and rejection is key to this field, as the research and publication process can involve crushing rejection. There is nothing like spending several years on a project that you are excited about, only to receive an outright rejection from your target journal. That is life, and that is academia. How well you can deal with that and move on is key to your success as an applicant.


    One mistake I made, and I would caution others from making, is to apply to "top schools" simply because they are "top schools." Early on in my process, I was very concerned about getting in to a prestigious school that could place me well simply by virtue of the name on the diploma. But later on I realized that it is not the name that will help you succeed in academia, it is the training you receive. You will receive the best training, and actually enjoy the process, if you are matched with faculty and a program with similar research interests. While rankings can be a good tool, I would argue that reseach fit is more important. I learned this lesson after I had already "finalized" my school list. As I was preparing to apply to a great program, I realized that I could not name I single faculty member that I would be interested in working with. I knew that my inability to do so would torpedo my chances at that school, but more importantly, my chances of enjoying the program.


    One piece of advice that I would offer, but that others may disagree with, is to have specific research interests and questions in mind during the process. I have encountered applicants who are very vague about their research interests, and my fear is that this conveys a lack of thought about, or even a lack of interest in, research. I kept notes every time an interesting research question popped in to my head, both to look back at during my program, but also to mention in the interview process. This also made it easier to call out faculty research interests and show a match. Of course, research interests are very fluid, and will change with time. But my opinion is that specific questions and interests can only help you in the application process.

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