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Thread: Using none

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    Yups! Almost there. dreamz's Avatar
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    Cool Using none

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    One of the posts on the TM forum has confused me much about the usage of none. Which is the correct verb in the following sentences:

    1) None of the attempts (explain, explains) why most of the people commit crimes.
    2) None of you (is, are) going to the party tonight.

    Please give your answers with a suitable explanation.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Using none

    Usage of 'none' depends on the conetext, however, none is, more often than not, assocaited with singular.
    If it's simple it wont appear on GMAT

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    Re: Using none

    None can be singular or plural
    depending on the subject in qestion

    attempts...are

    none of the articles are

    none of you are going to the party (please correct if worng)
    because in question form "Are none of you going to the party"

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    warmup over! piyusht's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Re: Using none

    First of all good question and confusing one too.. i tried looking for same answers and its really hilarious that at some places its saying none is singular, someplaces its being regarded as plural too...

    IMO, the indefinite pronoun none / no one can be either singular or plural, depending on its context and if i aint wrong thats the reason they are called INDEFINITE.

    None is nearly always plural (meaning "not any") except when something else in the sentence makes us regard it as a singular (meaning "not one"), as in "None of the food is fresh."

    The choice between a singular or plural verb depends on the desired effect. Both options are acceptable in this sentence:

    None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial.

    When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were (not was) interviewed by the committee. None can only be plural in its use in sentences such as None but his most loyal supporters believe (not believes) his story.

    No One deal only with people , not things but None represent for both things and people. So we should choose "none" in the sentence when we mean no one as well as no thing.
    Last edited by piyusht; 06-03-2005 at 08:27 AM.
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    Re: Using none

    Thanks all, your explanations have helped. Waiting for some more intelligent insights.
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    Re: Using none

    When NONE is used in the beginning of the sentence, the correct verb (whether singular or plural) is identified based on the subject/noun that follows that.

    If you take the examples,
    1) None of the attempts (explain, explains) why most of the people commit crimes.

    Here "attempts" is plural and so it has to take plural verb which is "explain"

    2) None of you (is, are) going to the party tonight.

    Here "you" considered to be plural in most cases and it has to take plural verb "are"

    Same rule applies for most, half etc words that starts in the begiining.

    Do this makes sense...

    In Piyus example
    None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial

    It should take "have" as the verb...that's what I feel

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    Re: Using none

    From Dictionary.com

    Usage Note: It is widely asserted that none is equivalent to no one, and hence requires a singular verb and singular pronoun: None of the prisoners was given his soup. It is true that none is etymologically derived from the Old English word n, “one,” but the word has been used as both a singular and a plural noun from Old English onward. The plural usage appears in the King James Bible as well as the works of John Dryden and Edmund Burke and is widespread in the works of respectable writers today. Of course, the singular usage is perfectly acceptable. The choice between a singular or plural verb depends on the desired effect. Both options are acceptable in this sentence: None of the conspirators has (or have) been brought to trial. When none is modified by almost, however, it is difficult to avoid treating the word as a plural: Almost none of the officials were (not was) interviewed by the committee. None can only be plural in its use in sentences such as None but his most loyal supporters believe (not believes) his story

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    Re: Using none

    Thanks, Niegra and Vaithy. Your explanations have surely enlightened me
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    We should treat "none" as plural to agree with context. Or should we treat "none" as singular.

    Please clarify.

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